Use of Prescription Monitoring in Suboxone Patients

I enthusiastically use my state’s prescription monitoring program. This database is available only to physicians who have applied and been approved for access. It records all controlled substance prescriptions filled by a patient, the prescribing doctor, and the pharmacy where they were filled. This means it records prescriptions for opioids, benzodiazepines, anabolic steroids, most sleeping pills, and prescription stimulants. Any prescription medication with the potential to cause addiction will be listed. Medications such an antibiotics, blood pressure medication, etc, aren’t controlled substances, and aren’t list on the website. 

I use this database in several ways.

It can help me decide if a new patient is really addicted to opioids, and appropriate for treatment

If a new patient has a urine drug screen that’s negative for all the opioids, and has no record of getting prescriptions for opioids, I’ll have to see objective evidence of addiction before starting to treat him with Suboxone. But if the urine is negative, and I see monthly oxymorphone prescriptions (sometimes missed on urine drug screens) have been filled, it’s more likely this patient is appropriate for Suboxone treatment. Rarely, a misguided, misinformed person might claim to be addicted to opioids in order to be prescribed Suboxone. This happened once to me, with a patient who was addicted to Xanax, and was convinced Suboxone would cure her. I referred her to more appropriate care.

Using the database can help detect a relapse sooner

Most of the patients in my Suboxone practice (around 80%) are pill takers, not heroin users. When they relapse, it tends to be to prescription opioids, obtained from a doctor unfamiliar with their history of addiction. I check each patient on the state’s database just prior to each visit, and if there are medications on the site I didn’t know about, that will be the main topic of our visit. New medication on the database doesn’t always mean a relapse, so I need to listen to their explanation.

 When it does mean a relapse, the patient and I decide what to do next. Often, the patient decides to allow me to call the other doctor, agrees to increase her “dose” of counseling, and possibly her dose of Suboxone, if it was an opioid relapse. If there are repeated relapses, I may decide Suboxone, as an outpatient, doesn’t provide the support a patient needs. Then, I refer to another form of treatment. Usually this means to a long-term inpatient drug rehab, or to an opioid treatment center, where the patient comes to the clinic every day. Either way, I believe I’m able to address a relapse more quickly using the database.

 Frequently, Suboxone patients get prescriptions for benzodiazepines. That’s a problem for me. For a person without addiction, benzodiazepines can be helpful, mostly used short-term. But for people with addiction, they usually cause problems, sooner or later. People with a previous addiction to any drug, especially including alcohol, need to regard prescription benzodiazepines as high-risk medications.

 I try to be flexible, too. If a traumatic event has occurred in the life of a patient, I may OK benzodiazepines short-term, provided I can see the patient more often and have good communication with the doctor prescribing the benzodiazepines.

  I also have to remember the body reacts the same to a mixture of opioids and benzos, no matter why they’re taken.  Even though Suboxone is safer than methadone, it’s still not safe when mixed with benzos, when taken for any reason.

If this sounds wishy-washy, that’s because it is. So many situations arise in the lives of patients that one hard and fast rule just doesn’t exist. That’s the art of medicine.

 Is the patient filling Suboxone on time?

The database also shows me when patients are filling the Suboxone prescription. If I write a prescription today, but the patient doesn’t fill it for two weeks, what’s going on there? Has he relapsed for several weeks? Did he have a stockpile of Suboxone from a previous prescription? Was he unable to afford it until now? All these questions and their answers are important to guide treatment.

 It makes me happy.

It warms my heart to see a patient who had a long list of opioid prescriptions from multiple doctors before starting Suboxone, then after entering treatment, see only Suboxone. This occurs in the majority of my patients.

My state’s prescription monitoring program is one of the best tools to help patients that I’ve ever seen. I believe it’s saved many lives. I think it’s just as important as drug screening for my Suboxone patients. Of course, the best tool for recovery is the counseling. I prefer 12-step recovery, as that provides ongoing support even after Suboxone treatment, but any kind of counseling helps. The patients I see doing the best are the ones involved in both formal counseling, in group or individual settings, along with 12-step meetings.

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One response to this post.

  1. Ola! Janaburson,
    This question may be a little off-topic, Being diagnosed with high blood pressure does not mean having to change every aspect of your
    life. It means having to watch your diet, to exercise regularly and to take prescribed medications.
    It also means having to monitor your blood pressure, either daily or weekly, or however often
    your doctor wants you to do so.
    Thx.

    Reply

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