Non-drug Ways to Help Insomnia

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Insomnia is defined as a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to get to sleep or stay asleep. Insomnia can come & go for periods of time, or can be a chronic problem. Not sleeping well can make us less able to handle the stresses of the next day, and can severely affect the quality of our lives.

Insomnia afflicts many patients in recovery, including those on medication assisted treatment with buprenorphine and methadone. Insomnia can occur for many reasons: the brain may be adjusting to life without the chemical ups & downs of addicted life, or because the patient had insomnia even before the addiction started. Physical health problems (chronic pain, thyroid disease, and menopause to name but a few) can cause insomnia or make it worse, as can mental illnesses like anxiety and mood disorders.

Active addiction can destroy normal sleep-wake cycles. Addictive chemicals disrupt the structure and function of the brain, and often people in active addiction become accustomed to passing out rather than falling asleep. It can be difficult to re-learn how to get to sleep naturally.

Many U.S. citizens, and not only addicts, have become “chemical copers.” We have the idea that every problem can and should be fixed with medication. But with insomnia, sleep hygiene is the best first option, and medication can be used if sleep hygiene doesn’t work.

Sleep hygiene, which sounds it means washing behind your ears at bedtime, really refers to habits that help us get satisfactory sleep. Most are common sense ideas, and they can really make a big difference. Here are some of these ideas:

1. Go to bed at the same time and wake at the same time every day, even on weekends.
If it’s at all possible, don’t go to bed later or sleep later on weekend days. Get your body into the habit of keeping a regular sleep/wake cycle. You will fall asleep more easily with a fixed bed time.
Besides making your feel better because you’ll get more regular sleep, this practice has other benefits. For example, people with migraine and tension headaches have fewer pain episodes with regular sleep/wake times. Keeping regular sleeping hours is also highly recommended for patients with bipolar disorder, as it can help with mood swings.

2. Avoid caffeine late in the day. For some people, drinking caffeine in the late afternoon can affect them up to six hours later. To be sure, cut off caffeine at least eight hours before you want to sleep. Caffeine doesn’t affect everyone to this degree, but unless you know for sure, try to limit late-day caffeine. If you consume energy drinks, consider cutting back or stopping them.

3. Make sure your bed is comfortable and your room as free from distractions as possible. Pets and rowdy bed partners may need to sleep in other areas. Make sure the room temperature is conducive to sleep and there’s no noise or light that may interrupt sleep. Keeping the television on for background noise isn’t a good idea and can prevent you from getting to the deeper levels of sleep.

4. Don’t set your alarm for earlier than you need to. Many of us like to do this so we can hit snooze a few times. However, the most beneficial sleep, REM sleep, comes at the end of the night, and we are depriving ourselves of REM sleep by hitting the snooze button a few times before getting out of bed for good.

5. Have a bedtime ritual. Have things you do each night before going to bed that relax you and put you in a mindset to sleep. This could be a series of ablutions like brushing your teeth, flossing, or taking a warm bath. Other people may prefer doing prayer or meditation to quiet the mind, or reading.

6. Don’t nap during the day to catch up on sleep. More than anything else, napping will keep you from sleeping at night.

This is a tough one for me, since napping has long been one of my hobbies. Because I think of a good nap as one of life’s great joys, on some days I’m willing to risk not being able to get to sleep at night and take the nap anyway.

7. Don’t use alcohol to help you sleep. While alcohol does cause faster sleep onset, it also shortens the sleep cycle, causing us to wake earlier, and robs us of the important REM sleep. Over long term, alcohol can greatly interfere with your sleep cycle.

8. Only use your bed for sleep. OK, for sex too. But don’t live in your bed so that you become accustomed to eating, watching television, and working on the computer in bed. Your mind should associate bed with sleep, and not these waking activities.

9. Exercise each day. More than most other suggestions, this one can help you more than you expect. Even a small amount of exercise can have surprisingly good benefits. Don’t exercise too close to bedtime, since exercise can have a stimulating effect.

Sometimes people in early recovery find they want to sleep more than usual. This can be part of your physical recovery, and I think it’s best to listen to your body and allow yourself extra sleep time without feeling guilty. However, some mood disorders also make people want to “take to the bed” during times of stress and negative emotion. This latter situation may need medication if it continues or interferes with your life.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by kevin on October 23, 2015 at 5:19 am

    I have horrible sleeping problems. I take trazadone for sleep at the moment. I don’t snore, I hum in my sleep, it starts softly and progressively gets louder. I have been told this could be serious. I make jokes with my partner that its just my internal phone off the hook, you know….if you would like to make a call please hang up and try again…..but that’s just me trying to make light of it. I would like sleep study to find out but it doesn’t happen every night and it started out on my back but I have done it on my sides sometimes too but far less

    Reply

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