Conference

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I just got back from the yearly American Society of Addiction Medicine conference. As always, it was a treat. It’s so refreshing to be surrounding by other physicians who know addiction is a treatable illness and not a moral shortcoming. I feel revitalized from being around people who also love treating people with substance use disorders, and who also love seeing people get well and get back to being themselves.

This conference was huge. Over 1800 people attended. When I went to my first ASAM meeting in 2004, I think there were around 300 attendees. What a difference!

This year, I sensed even more hopefulness and enthusiasm than in past years. Last month, Addiction Medicine was finally recognized as a legitimate specialty of medicine. Finally, we got recognition that we have a substantial body of science with data that supports the work we do.

Recently, there’s more conversation about treating people with opioid addiction. We see television shows, online articles, and blog posts about the opioid addiction epidemic and the death toll it’s exacting on our nation. Even President Obama recently emphasized the importance of treating people with opioid addiction, and the obligation of incorporating medication-assisted treatment. More federal and state grants are available to start programs to help people with substance use disorders.

All of these recent changes encouraged me, but the speakers at the ASAM conference pushed my enthusiasm further.

On the first session of the first day, Dr. Nora Volkow, director of NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse), spoke. She was her usual brilliant self, giving a concise summary of this nation’s present opioid addiction situation. She discussed many of the same studies I’ve highlighted in my blog over this past year, so I felt good about that.

Next to speak was Dr. William Miller, the “father” of Motivational Interviewing. His lecture, titled “The Power of Empathy in Addiction Treatment,” was a gift. It reminded me of why I love what I do, and how I can continue to improve as a clinician.

I also went to his ninety-minute session about the basics of Motivational Interviewing. I’ve read all three editions of his book, “Motivational Interviewing,” and I’ve seen videos of therapists using MI as a counseling technique. Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based method of counseling people in order to help them change.

MI sounds much easier than it is. It also looks easy when I watch other people do it, but it’s much more difficult than it looks. Fortunately, my fiancé is a “MINTee,” meaning he’s one of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers for Motivational Interviewing. I figure that can’t help but rub off on me. Plus, he helps train the counselors at our local opioid treatment program. In my obviously biased opinion, he’s helped our counselors become much better at their jobs, which ultimately benefits our patients.

I went to many other ASAM sessions – from a lecture on contingency management techniques to a discussion about buprenorphine doses above 16mg. All were excellent. Even though it’s impossible to attend all the sessions, since many times there were four of five going on at the same time in different rooms, I plan to listen to the recordings of them all on ASAM’s website when they become available.

And I will return to work a better, more enthusiastic doctor.

 

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2 responses to this post.

  1. I was hoping to attend the conference as well and hope to attend the one in October in D.C. What was the thought on raising the buprenorphine limit to 200? Is this being supported by practitioners or no? I have been at my 100 patient limit for over 2 years and I have people calling daily for a spot which I just don’t have. Treatment saves lives. Why such a barrier to treatment?? Last I knew, the TREAT Act passed but there is no talk as to when the limits will be increased. I love your blogs..keep them coming.

    Reply

  2. Posted by stephen Bain meathdone rep from 1981 to today. on April 21, 2016 at 4:18 am

    money its only money,now if it was for guns they would be sending truck loads. in nz there gp only needs two hours training? and off you go,support is some what not there,i haven’t seen a case worker in well over a year.i see the c.e.o pays gone up and staff numbers very low. all the best to you.

    Reply

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