Suboxone Manufacturer Sued for Anticompetitive Practices

Pharma Lies

 

 

 

I read a brief news item online about the drug manufacturer getting sued, but I didn’t get detailed information until I read last week’s issue of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly (ADAW).

Here’s the scoop: the Attorneys General for thirty-six states are suing Reckitt-Benckiser (RB, now called Indivior), because the company attempted to block generics from entering the market after RB’s patent for sublingual buprenorphine products expired.

Reckitt-Benckiser manufactured Suboxone and Subutex, which were the initial buprenorphine products that came to market in 2002, after the DATA 2000 law was passed.

As a reminder, before DATA 2000 was passed, it was illegal to treat opioid use disorder in an office setting with an opioid prescription. Doctors have gone to jail for this. Before DATA 2000, opioid treatment programs (OTP) were the only setting where prescribing (methadone was the only approved medication) for opioid addiction was permitted, and these OTPs have always been strictly regulated by multiple governmental agencies.

The FDA has approved only one medication, buprenorphine, to be used under DATA 2000, and only the sublingual form was approved. Then earlier this year, a second form of buprenorphine was approved to treat opioid addiction: the six-month, sustained release implantable rods impregnated with buprenorphine, known as Probuphine.

Buprenorphine taken by other routes of administration aren’t covered by DATA 2000, and therefore can’t be used to treat opioid addiction. These forms include the name brands Butrans patch, Belbucca oral film, and IV/IM buprenorphine used for pain control.

Reckitt-Benckiser’s patent for sublingual buprenorphine tablets was set to expire around 2008. Years before that, RB worked on finding a different delivery system, and the film version of Suboxone came out in mid-2010. This new form had its own patent, so that RB was the only company that could manufacture and sell that form of their medication.

However, since their sublingual tablet had come off patient, other drug companies could make generics, which would bring down the price to consumers of this life-saving medication.

But the Attorneys General allege RB tried to block the release of the generic tablets. RB told their drug salespeople to tell doctors that children were dying from ingesting buprenorphine tablets, and that the risk of prescribing this form of treatment was too great. They said the safest way to treat patients was with the film, which comes individually wrapped in a foil packet. And remember, only RB manufactured this film.

On May 12, 2012, I blogged about Reckitt-Benckiser’s attempt to persuade me to prescribe only the film. In that blog post, I describe how the drug representative told me that sublingual tablets were now suddenly too dangerous to prescribe, due to pediatric overdoses. She also told me it was much better for patients to be prescribed the film, since people addicted to pills could be triggered by tablets.

Her credibility took a big hit that day, because she’d promoted the hell out of her company’s tablet form of Suboxone and Subutex to me for years. I called her out on the inconsistency and disingenuousness of her statements, promulgated by her company, and I blogged about it.

At her next visit, she told me she was “disappointed that I chose such a public forum to describe our conversation.”

It was the first time someone chastised me for something I wrote on my blog, and I was elated. I felt like a real journalist!

She hasn’t visited my office since, and I haven’t missed her. She’s a nice lady, which is the only reason I put up with her in the first place. Right or wrong, I‘ve always found drug reps to be tedious.

I harbor no illusions about what drug reps do. Their job is to sell their product. When I worked in primary care, I was lied to on a regular basis by drug reps. For example, when the drug rep for a company that sold Prempro told me that estrogen replacement therapy reduced the risk of breast cancer. I remember being shocked into silence as I frowned at him, wondering if he thought I was really, really stupid.

Back to the point of this blog. So in 2012, R-B tried to prevent the generic from coming onto the market by saying the pediatric overdose problem was so bad that only the films (still under patent with R-B) should be prescribed

The lawsuit alleges consumers had to pay higher prices due to RB’s efforts to block generic tablets. These states want Indivior, formerly Reckitt-Benckiser, to pay back billions of dollars of profit obtained through unfair practices.

The lawsuit alleges the company manufactured claims of pediatric safety as a way to manipulate doctors into switching their patients over to the film, instead of continuing to prescribe the tablet form of the medication, which would have generic versions coming onto the market soon.

The drug company, as well as the company that developed the film technology, both say they did nothing wrong, and that their product has saved countless lives.

So…what is the price difference for different forms of buprenorphine? I did some current comparisons for my area on www.goodrx.com, recording the lowest price on the site for people with no insurance. Here are the results:

Generic buprenorphine: dose of 16mg per day, #60 tabs: $133

Generic combination product, buprenorphine/naloxone, dose of 16mg per day, #60 tabs: $243

Name brand Suboxone Film, same dose of 16mg per day, #60 films: $455

Name brand Zubsolv, dose of 5.7mg, two per day, #60 tabs: $455

Name brand Bunavail buccal film, 4.2mg, two per day (highest recommended maintenance dose) #60 films: $455

I’m sure readers find it remarkable, as I do, that all three of the name brand forms are the same price. It’s also interesting that the cheapest form, generic buprenorphine monoproduct, is only 28% of what the name brands all cost.

Here’s something more fascinating – BlueCross/Blue Shield of NC requires prior authorization for every one of their covered patients who are prescribed buprenorphine. For years, this insurance company will ONLY authorize payment for the name brand Suboxone in film form. They refuse to pay for the cheaper generic, either mono or combination forms.

I don’t know why BC/BS decided to only cover the name brand Suboxone films.

I could understand if they wouldn’t pay for the monoproduct, due to concerns that it’s more desirable on the black market, and the insurance company may not want to contribute to this problem. But why do they object to the generic combo product? Perhaps they worked out a special, cheaper deal, or perhaps they were swayed by drug manufacturer patter.

It’s hard for me to see that Reckitt-Benckiser/Indivior did anything different than what other drug companies do routinely. Of course their drug salespeople exaggerated the danger of pediatric exposure to buprenorphine tablets in an effort to influence doctors to prescribe only the films. But their claims were so weak and transparent that it would be a gullible doctor indeed who fell for the company line.

And since when do doctors accept what a drug company salesperson tells them at face value? I’m not saying outright lying by drug company representatives should ever be OK, but…it happens.

The drug companies make big bucks, but they counter by saying they spend so much money in research and development of new drugs, and if it weren’t for their work, we wouldn’t have all these new medications that we have that are extending peoples’ lives.

That’s somewhat of a legitimate point, but at what point do we say the drug companies are making adequate profits or excessive profits? And at what point does an exaggeration about a medication become a lie?

 

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5 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by azmd@aol.com on October 10, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Did you read that Canadian doctors are allowed to prescribe heroin to their patients? Allan Zubkin MD

    Reply

  2. Good chronology- one suggestion- might add the other forms of Buprenorphine that were appproved prior to Probuphine-
    Zubsolv (5 years ago) and Bunavail ( 2yrs go)

    Reply

  3. I enjoyed this article, thank you for making this public. I remember all too well sometime around when the Suboxone patent expired and the new patented film was introduced how all of the sudden the marketing literature began casting Suboxone tablets as a terrible threat to all of society and that due to this danger Rickett was going to voluntarily stop manufacturing them.

    Reply

  4. Posted by Tyson Pollock on November 28, 2017 at 5:16 pm

    So you are telling me that there is a generic buprenorphine/Naloxone available ? I have been paying around 400 a month cash no insurance for over two years my doctor has said nothing to me of a cheaper alternative and he knows I struggle to pay my bills to stay on suboxone but still is the better option for me than to risk relapse

    Reply

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