Subcutaneous Buprenorphine Injections for Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve blogged in the past about studies conducted on CAM2038, a new preparation of buprenorphine that can be given in a subcutaneous injection weekly or monthly. I think this delivery system holds great promise for the treatment of opioid use disorder.

Earlier this year, pharmacokinetic data from healthy volunteers showed that blood levels with the subcutaneous injections equaled the levels provided by sublingual means. This data supports the idea that the injections should provide therapeutic levels in patients with opioid use disorder. [1]

Later this year, a Phase II study was published in JAMA Psychiatry. Weekly subcutaneous preparation of buprenorphine was administered to 47 subjects with opioid use disorder. These patients were not seeking treatment, but had agreed to take part in this study, and all were diagnosed with opioid use disorder, either moderate or severe.

These subjects were given dose of either 24mg or 32mg one week apart, and had complete suppression of opioid withdrawal at both doses. The subjects were then challenged with varying doses of hydromorphone, and had sustained blockade of response to the hydromorphone. [2]

The six-month implant, brand name Probuphine, hasn’t been widely prescribed. As I predicted, the confusion over cost, insurance coverage, and implantation regulations have so complicated Probuphine’s use that mainstream medical providers aren’t considering its use. Also, it’s only indicated for patients on 8mg or less of sublingual buprenorphine, and patients have concerns about what will happen if it doesn’t work well. They ask if their insurance companies would pay for supplemental buprenorphine if the implant doesn’t work as well for them. I don’t know for sure, but I’m guessing they would not pay for supplemental medication.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 My biggest concern with Probuphine was that patients may be less inclined to come for counseling sessions if they have had a six-month implant that keeps them feeling normal. They have no monthly incentive to see their physicians. Many physicians require counseling as a condition for ongoing monthly prescription for sublingual buprenorphine.

I like the idea of injections for weekly or monthly buprenorphine. If it works as well or better than sublingual buprenorphine, it could be the solution to some difficult problems.

  • It would save time for my patients on buprenorphine at the opioid treatment program. One of the complaints we hear is of the regulations surrounding treatment in our setting. Unlike in the office-based setting, buprenorphine prescribing at the opioid treatment program demands we follow the sometimes onerous rules of both state and federal laws governing opioid treatment programs.
  • It would resolve our diversion dilemma.But injections can’t be diverted, so far as I’m aware.
  • Because buprenorphine has a high street value in my community, patients are sometimes tempted to spit out their medication to sell it, or even to inject it into themselves. We don’t want this, given the high rates of complications with intravenous use. We don’t want patients to sell medication because it hurts our reputation in the community. We don’t want to be known as suppliers of illicit buprenorphine.
  • It would be a godsend for patients who have to go to jail unexpectedly.
  • Most of the time, jails won’t bring incarcerated patients to the OTP for their daily dose of buprenorphine (or methadone), so they suffer opioid withdrawal and are at risk for relapse upon being released, with increased risk of overdose death. But if we can give them a monthly or even weekly shot, it will keep them feeling better, and serve as a blocker if they do leave jail and use illicit opioids like Opana or oxycodone or heroin.
  • Patients wouldn’t have to think about taking medication each day; with the injections they wouldn’t have to take a dose of anything each day, just show up for weekly or monthly injections given to them by a medical professional
  • Subcutaneous injections are much less complicated to administer than Probuphine, with rods that require a minor surgical procedure to implant, then explant six months later.The FDA plans to discuss this new preparation of buprenorphine at their advisory committee meeting November 1, 2017. Several days prior to this meeting, data to be discussed at this meeting should be available online for interested readers. [3]If this new option is approved by the FDA, it can give us yet another tool with which to treat patients, always a good thing.
  • 1. Albayaty et al., Advanced Therapeutics, 2017, Feb; 34 (2)

 

  • 2.Walsh et al., JAMA Psychiatry, 2017;74(9):894-902.

 

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by dbcincarnated on October 16, 2017 at 1:02 am

    This comment will be moderated out perhaps, and it is perhaps OT. However, I just wanted to note that after over 10 years of being on Suboxone (bupe) I have tapered off and am now clean. I still have some other things to clean up (benzo class), but the numbness is being relieved. I am thankful for my self-employment that allowed me the time I need.

    I will say that Suboxone clinics are not all the same. Obvious, but the spectrum goes from a sincere desire to help to a sincere desire to defraud. Be careful.

    Reply

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