Update on Jail Death Lawsuits

 

 

 

 

Long-time readers of my blog will remember the story of Eric Stojcevski, a young man who died from withdrawal from prescribed medication while in jail in Macomb County, Michigan, for unpaid traffic tickets in 2014.

I blogged about this case on November 3, 2017, February 5, 2016, and October 20, 2015.

I’ve given readers periodic updates because to me, this case is the most extreme example of how poorly sick inmates are treated by jailers. I feel this is one of our country’s biggest moral failings, because it goes on all the time, usually with little to no publicity.

Someone once said we can judge the quality of a society by how we treat the most vulnerable members of that society. Incarcerated people are among the most vulnerable, since they can’t take themselves to a hospital for medical care if they get sick. They are dependent on the jailers to get them care when ill.

This did not happen in the case of David Stojcevski. In June of 2014, he went to jail for failure to pay parking tickets, and it turn into a death sentence. According to news sources, he was being prescribed methadone, clonazepam, and alprazolam by a physician. He was not given any of these prescribed medications when he was in jail.

According to his autopsy, he died from acute drug withdrawal on the seventeenth day of his thirty-day sentence. Despite intense suffering, his pleas for medical attention were ignored. When he exhibited bizarre (withdrawal) behavior, he was sent to a mental health cell, where his last eleven days on earth were videotaped. His family, livid at the lack of medical care that resulted in his death, released the videotape online, where it went viral. The recording showed him naked, having repeated seizures on the jail floor as he died.

His family filed a civil case against jail personnel, and against Correct Care Solutions, the health organization that was contractually obligated to provide medical care to prisoners in the Macomb County jail.

There was a criminal investigation that went nowhere.

The Department of Justice investigated, and said they found no evidence of criminal intent on the part of jail personnel or personnel of Correct Care Solutions. The FBI had to be forced by the family to release its investigation records, and only released part of them.

These records should be helpful to the family’s civil case, and now depositions for this civil case are underway.

According to news reports, [1] Sheriff Wickersham’s sworn testimony revealed that David lost forty pounds in his last seventeen days, spent in the county jail. Over the last three days of his life, he drank almost no water. Of the thirty-three meals served to him over the last eleven days of his life, he ate perhaps three of them.

According to news reports, jail guards thought the medical staff was responsible for deciding when a patient should go to the hospital. Medical staff thought it was the guards’ responsibility to monitor the amount of food and water inmates are consuming.

Sheriff Wickersham admitted he was responsible for the well-being of the inmates, but also admitted he rarely enters the jail. Even though his office is located a few feet from the jail, he enters the jail perhaps once per month. He said he delegated oversight of medical care to another employee, who had no medical training.

News reports didn’t say whether Correct Care Solutions employees had been contacted about the state of health David was in during his last days.

News reports did say that David’s prescribing physician, Dr. Bernard Shelton, was charged with unlawful delivery of controlled substances. [2] This report says he prescribed four million “addictive pills” to Macomb County residents, though it didn’t specify over what period of time or what type of pills they were. From what he prescribed David Stojcevski, it appears to have been opioids and benzodiazepines.

In 2017, according to the state of Michigan’s medical board documentation, Dr. Shelton lost his medical license for inappropriate prescribing of controlled substances that were outside acceptable practice. His charts were reviewed by other physicians, who have the knowledge to judge such things. They said he didn’t check patients on the Michigan prescription monitoring website, he didn’t keep complete records, and lacked essential documentation.

The medical board suspended his medical license for fifteen months, fined him $10,000, and said he wouldn’t be considered for license re-instatement unless he could prove, with clear and convincing evidence, that he had good moral character, the ability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety, the ability to follow the guidelines of re-instatement, and for it to be in the public interest that he be licensed again. At present, he does not have a license to practice in Michigan.

Now it appears Dr. Shelton will face criminal charges as well as losing his medical license.

But getting back to David Stojcevski’s case…even if his doctor prescribed opioids recklessly and inappropriately, it doesn’t release the sheriff of his obligation to make sure inmates receive medical care. Watching David suffer on the recordings made by the jail, I can’t help but wonder why no one took any action to help a man obviously in serious need of medical attention.

What if Sheriff Wickersham (or one of his deputies) walked down the street of whatever town is in Macomb County, Michigan, and he came to a man lying on the sidewalk, barely conscious, having a seizure. What would he do? I expect he would squat down beside the sick man, check for a pulse, and summon 911 for help. That’s what most citizens would do, out of common decency and concern for a fellow human.

In other words, it did not take any medical knowledge to know David was in serious need of medical help, yet no one in the whole jail called 911.

You can believe I’ll be watching this case unfold. It has the potential to be a multi-million -dollar case. In other similar cases, awards were in the three-million-dollar range. It’s sad that is takes a large financial award to change the way people do things, but in this case, it appears necessary.

It’s too late for David, but a large settlement or award against Macomb County and against Sheriff Wickersham could be another paving stone on the road of appropriate medical care for vulnerable inmates.

  1. https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/defenders/sheriff-answers-questions-under-oath-about-death-of-inmate-at-macomb-county-jail (accessed 7/4/18)
  2. https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/defenders/doctor-charged-with-distributing-opioids-to-inmate-who-died-from-withdrawal-at-macomb-county-jail (accessed 7/4/18)
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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Alan Wartenberg MD on July 8, 2018 at 3:45 am

    I have been involved as an expert witness in many horrendous cases, similar to the one above, where the lack of care, and the apparent total lack of empathy or even basic humanity on the part of both correction officers and medical/nursing personnel is horrifying, However, getting a jury to convict in these cases is equivalent to getting one to convict police officers who shoot people, who are unarmed and fleeing, in the back.

    The unspoken but clearly delivered message that the lawyers for the defendants deliver in these cases is that jails and prisons, as well as police, are all that stand between those jurors (and other honest citizens) from a fate that is exploited in all the “Purge” movies. Citizens believe that these systems are protecting them from savagery, and they are loathe to hold them responsible. Besides, as we all know, the druggies have it coming to them.

    I recently was involved in a case where the jail doctor (and his company, which consisted essentially of the doctor), and the VNA (which provided the nursing care) both settled with the victims family – a woman who was repeatedly jailed for DUI warrants, had a history of at least one withdrawal seizure, had been treated in the jail infirmary for withdrawal before, yet was never reported by the correction officers to nursing.

    As in Jana’s case, everybody pointed their fingers at everybody else. At least, the attorneys for the doctors and nurses recognized that they had liability (if not guilt) in this woman’s death and they settled with the family. However, the county and the jail officials, who were ultimately responsible for this “nobody is really in charge so nobody is responsible” system, were not held liable by a jury, despite what I thought was persuasive testimony from me, as well as a nationally reknowned pathologist, and a well regarded expert on jail/prison medical care.

    Again, I think the jury (and citizens in general) believe that findings against jails or cops makes THEM less safe, and makes it MORE likely that these imprisoned evil-doers will wreak their havoc on the community. It is a very sad situation.

    Reply

    • That’s appalling.
      Of course, as you know, good people can end up involved with the legal system.
      If we don’t worry about the rights of prisoners now, who will be willing to help us when our rights are trampled?
      It’s a national disgrace.

      Reply

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