Archive for the ‘Am I an Addict?’ Category

Fentanyl is the New Heroin

aaaaoverdose-deaths

 

 

 

Big drug labs in China and Mexico have found it’s cheaper to manufacture the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl than it is to harvest and process opium into heroin. Therefore, much of what is sold as heroin is now mixed with fentanyl and its more potent analogues, sufentanil and carfentanil.

This is causing heroin overdose deaths in the U.S.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse issued a recent report saying that heroin overdose deaths increased over six-fold from 2002 to 2015. This is shown in the graphic at the beginning of this blog.

This problem is worse in some regions of our country than others; the Northeast has traditionally been plagued with heroin deaths at a high rates, but other areas of the country have higher rates of increase in heroin deaths.

There’s no way to know the potency of drugs sold as heroin, making it much easier to overdose and die.

There are some basic precautions that drug users can take to prevent overdose deaths. This is data all comes from the Harm Reduction Coalition:

  • Don’t use alone. Use with a friend, and stagger your injection times so that one person is alert enough to summon help if needed.
  • Have a naloxone kit available and know how to use it. You can get a free kit from many places, including harm reduction organizations. http://harmreduction.org/issues/overdose-prevention/tools-best-practices/od-kit-materials/
  • Do a test dose. This means instead of injecting your usual amount, try a tiny bit of the drug first, to help assess how strong it is.
  • Use new equipment, if possible. Some pharmacies are willing to sell new needles and syringes with no questions asked. Other drug users in your community may be able to tell you which pharmacies are willing to do this.
  • Remember that if you’ve had a period of time where you’ve been unable to use any drugs, your tolerance may be much lower. Highest overdose risk is seen in patients who have just been released from jail, from detox units, or from the hospital. Do NOT go back to the same amount you were using in the past.
  • Don’t mix drugs. Opioid overdose risk increases when other drugs are used too.
  • Consider getting into addiction treatment. https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

 

aaaaodpills

 

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My Favorite Patients Have Opioid Use Disorder

dogs-asleep-and-falling-off-couch

 

 

I’m lazy and bloated from too much tryptophan from turkey, so I’m going to post an article today that’s a re-run. I wrote it for a physicians’ magazine, and I’m pleased to say it was published (around six or so years ago). The original title was “My Favorite Patients are Drug Addicts,” but in keeping with newer language, I updated the title:

When I was a fresh faced, newly unleashed graduate from my Internal Medicine residency twenty-three years ago, I never dreamed my favorite patients would be drug addicts.

In medical school, I learned little about drug and alcohol addiction and its treatment, and in residency, even less. I was well trained in the management of acute alcohol withdrawal, acute GI bleeding from alcoholic gastritis, and antibiotic coverage of endocarditis in an injection heroin user, but I couldn’t tell any of these patients how to find recovery from the actual underlying cause of their problems. I could only treat the sequellae, and I didn’t always do that with much grace.

The addicted person caused their own miseries, I thought, and since these were the Reagan years, they should “just say no” when offered drugs. My attitudes mirrored those of the attending physicians in my residency program. When an addict was admitted twice for endocarditis, needing an artificial valve the first admission, and its replacement on the second admission for re-infection, I was just as irritated as the attending and the rest of the house staff. I remember we discussed whether we could ethically refuse him treatment if he came in a third time! We were so self-righteous, though we had offered him little in the way of treatment for his disease of addiction. We might have had a social worker ask him if he wanted to go away for inpatient treatment, he said no, and that’s where our efforts ended.

I knew nothing about medication-assisted therapies for opioid addiction. Now I know better.

I was working part time in primary care when a colleague, the medical director at a local drug addiction treatment center, asked me if I could work for him at this center for a few days while he was out of town. He was a good friend so I agreed. I thought it would be easy money, and fun, doing admission histories and physicals on addicts entering the inpatient residential program, and I was right…but I also saw patients entering the clinic’s methadone program.

This appalled me. It seemed seedy, shady, and maybe a “fringe” area of medicine. It just seemed like a bad idea to give opioid addicts methadone. However, I had made a commitment to my friend, so I told myself I would work those few days, tell my friend politely when he returned that I didn’t “believe” in methadone (as if it were a unicorn or some other mythical beast) and could not work there again.

But when I talked to these patients they surprised and intrigued me. Some patients were intravenous heroin addicts, but most were addicted to pain pills, like OxyContin, various forms of hydrocodone, and morphine. Most of them had jobs and families, and expressed an overwhelming desire to be free from their addiction. I was most intrigued by how the patients talked about methadone treatment. They said such things as “It gave me my life back” and “Now I don’t think about using drugs all the time” and “Methadone saved my marriage and my life”.

Huh? With methadone, weren’t they still using drugs?

My curiosity piqued, I started reading everything I could find about methadone – and to my surprise discovered that the treatment of opioid addiction with methadone is one of the most evidence-based treatments used in medicine today, with forty years worth of solid data proving its efficacy. So why had I never heard of it? I could have referred many intravenous heroin addicts that I saw during my residency, which happened to be during the height of the spread of HIV, for effective treatment of their addiction. Because of methadone’s unique pharmacology, it blocks physical opioid withdrawal symptoms for greater than 24 hours in most patients, and also blocks the euphoria of illicit opioids. At the proper dose, patients should not be sedated or in withdrawal, and are able to function normally, working and driving without difficulty. Therefore, methadone maintenance is not “like giving whiskey to the alcoholic” as some ill informed people – like me – have accused.

For the next eight years I happily worked part time with my friend at this drug treatment center, and saw most methadone patients improve dramatically. Certainly methadone did not work for everyone, but it was a good treatment for many addicts. I did see some tough characters, but I was struck by how normal most of the patients seemed; most were not scary thugs as I had imagined, but housewives and construction workers.

Then I began hearing about a second medication to treat opioid addiction, called buprenorphine, better known by its brand name, Suboxone. The principle of this drug is the same as for methadone: it is a long-acting opioid, can be dosed once per day, and at the proper dose removes the physical withdrawal symptoms, and does not impair patients or give them a high. As an added bonus, it can be prescribed through a doctor’s office. In 2000, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act allowed doctors, for the first time in about 80 years, to prescribe specifically approved schedule III, IV, or V controlled opioid for the purpose of treating people with opioid addiction. Shortly after this, the FDA approved buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction, and the drug became available in 2003. In order to prescribe buprenorphine, a doctor must take an eight hour training course, petition the DEA for a special “X” number, and give notice to CSAT, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, of her intent to prescribe. Doctors prescribing buprenorphine also must have the ability to refer patients for the counseling that is so necessary for recovery from addiction.

Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, is a milder opioid and there’s a ceiling on its opioid effects, making it a safer and better choice for many patients than methadone. It is particularly good for addicts with relatively short periods of addiction, and fairly stable lives. Since it is a milder opioid, it is relatively easier to taper, if appropriate.

I started prescribing buprenorphine from a private office and loved it from the first. Initially, Suboxone was expensive, but now generic forms have been approved, and prices have come down a little. Opioid treatment programs, formerly known as “methadone clinics” have started offering buprenorphine in addition to methadone.

The opioid addicts I met both in the opioid treatment program and in my private office have not been what I expected. The vast majority are ordinary, likeable people with jobs and families. They are your hairdresser, your grocery clerk, the guy that works on your furnace. They sit beside you at the movies and behind you at church. Because they have built a tolerance to the sedating effects of opioids, they do not look impaired or high; they are able to function normally in society…as long as they have a supply of opioids.

If they are in withdrawal, without a source for opioids, they will be sick. Some people compare opioid withdrawal to having the flu, but it is not. It is like having the flu…and then being hit by a truck. Most addicts in opioid withdrawal are unable to work because of the severe muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many of these patients are blue collar workers with physically demanding jobs who initially used pain pills to mask their physical pain so that they can work harder, better, faster…never guessing that what seemed to be helping was actually causing them more harm than they could imagine.

Some patients seen in the office setting were professionals. Most professionals can afford the more expensive inpatient thirty- to ninety- day rehabs, a luxury for many of the working middle class. But I saw some lawyers, nurses, even policemen with opioid addiction who refused to consider inpatient treatment even if they could afford it. These professionals were concerned about their livelihood if it became public that they had a problem with addiction, or because they were unwilling to take time off work. They were willing to come to a doctor’s office where no one would know why they were being seen, and they did very well on buprenorphine.

I am thrilled when seeing a patient respond positively to treatment with buprenorphine. Many return on the second visit looking like younger and happier versions of themselves. On the second visit, a common phrase is “It’s a miracle!” Many patients say they just feel normal, even though they had forgotten what normal felt like. When an addict begins to recover, the changes are usually dramatic; they begin to smile, to restore relationships, to rejoin their families and their communities. When an addict recovers, the ripple effect extends throughout the community.

We know now that addiction is indeed a chronic disease much like asthma and diabetes. Just like these diseases, there are behavior components that can make the disease worse, and there are genetic and personal factors that put some people at higher risk. Sadly, many addicts are still treated with distain and disgust by their doctors, an attitude we would not tolerate towards any other disease. This causes patients to hide addiction from their doctors, and the disease worsens.

Many people, even doctors, still object to the use of medication assisted therapies for addicts, saying “it’s trading one drug for another,”  when in reality it is trading active addiction for medication, when prescribed responsibly and appropriately. Drug-free recovery is ideal, but with opioid addiction, it does patients a disservice to dismiss the mountains of evidence proving the effectiveness of medication-assisted therapies with buprenorphine and methadone.

Detoxification alone (usually five to seven days) does not work, and shows relapse rates of up to 96%. If detoxification alone worked, the policy of imprisonment for addicts promulgated in the 1950’s would have solved the opioid addiction problem. It didn’t.

For most patients, their big question is: “How soon can I get off of this drug?” Most express a desire to be completely drug free at some point, but I think it’s important to get each patient involved in a recovery program before tapering their medication. This can be an intensive outpatient program at a treatment center, an individual therapist, or through 12-step recovery.

Some patients, particularly those with both opioid addiction and chronic pain, prefer to remain on buprenorphine or methadone indefinitely as the safest treatment for both problems, and these patients also seem to do very well.

As for me, I plan to continue treating addicts of all types. These patients have been among the most grateful that I have encountered in primary care, and show the most improvement. When I treat addicts and see peace return to a face that had been filled with shame, I get a unique feeling of accomplishment. These are events I am honored to witness.

 

September is National Recovery Month!

recovery

September is National Recovery Month, so it’s a good time to come back from my blogging break. Following are some things that recovery means to me, and I hope my readers will write in with their own definition of recovery.

Recovery means…

….taking the worst and most embarrassing thing in my life and turning it into my greatest asset.

….becoming less judgmental of other people.

….remaining teachable.

….having more free time, after the burden of looking for the “next one” has been lifted.

…looking in the mirror, and feeling content at what I see.

….being satisfied with the small pleasures in life.

….developing a thicker skin for judgmental people. They aren’t going to ruin my day.

….re-connecting with the human race.

….re-connecting with the God of my understanding.

…reconnecting with myself.

….doing what I need to do for my well-being, even if other people don’t approve.

….being happy when I make progress, no longer expecting perfection.

….understanding it’s more important what I think of me than what other people think of me.

….talking frequently with other people who share my passion for recovery.

Recovery goes beyond 12-step programs or medication-assisted treatment. Recovery can apply to issues other than drug addiction. It can apply to eating disorders, co-dependency, gambling problems, sex addiction, or any other compulsive activity that is bad for our health. We can be in good recovery in one area of our life and be in active addiction in other areas. We have good and bad days. We relapse, and we try again, and we stop listening to the voice of addiction that tells us we should give up because we will always fail. We learn from our failures and come to look at them as opportunities for growth. We turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones. We lift up our fellow travelers when they weaken and they do the same for us.

We do recover.

 

Recovery Rocks

The Difference a Day Can Make

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaprince

 

 

News about the cause of Prince’s death was released last week. According to numerous news reports, he died from an overdose of a synthetic opioid called fentanyl, an opioid so potent that it’s measured in micrograms instead of milligrams.

This is the same drug that anesthesiologists and anesthetists get addicted to. It’s such a powerful drug that often the deceased is found with the needle still in his arm.

News stories don’t say how Prince took the medication, only that it was self-administered and that it killed him. Reports didn’t say whether it was prescribed for him or obtained illicitly.

I came of age in the 1980’s and like so many of my friends, loved Prince’s music. He was such a great musician that he managed to remain creative long after the 80’s were done, however.

I remember seeing the clip of Monica Lewinsky hugging President Clinton, and wondering if she chose her hat after listening to his “Raspberry Beret.” I was in recovery from addiction myself by the time New Year’s Eve, 1999 rolled around, so it was one of best New Year’s I’ve ever had. I remembered it, for one thing, and remember listening to the song that night, of course, while we were bracing for the Y2K apocalypse that never came.

Prince had been treated from chronic hip and leg pain, and probably developed addiction as a complication of that treatment. In that regard, he is just like so many of my patients. They never intended to become addicted. Prince, as a Jehovah’s Witness, would theoretically be at lower risk for addiction than many people, since he didn’t drink alcohol or use illicit drugs. But like so many other people, he appears to have developed addiction during the treatment of pain.

Saddest of all the information I read in news reports is that Prince had an appointment with an addiction medicine doctor the day after his death, to get help with his opioid addiction. By now, it’s well-known that Dr. Kornfield, an addictionologist in California, sent his son with a Suboxone film intended for Prince, but by the time the son arrived, Prince was dead. Prince supposedly had an appointment with a Minnesota addiction medicine doctor the next morning.

One day later, he could have had the help he needed. This underlines the seriousness of the opioid use disorder.

If you have this disease, learn from Prince. Anyone can develop the disease of addiction, even a musical genius. So get help now. Tomorrow may be too late.

In Praise of Opioids

Tibia xray

Some readers of my blog mistakenly think I’m opposed to all opioids, all of the time. That’s not true at all. I’m only opposed to the misuse or addiction to opioids, which can cause undue suffering. I’m a big fan of opioids, when used cautiously and in the right setting.

The benefit of opioids was driven home to me personally when I fell and broke my leg several years ago. Here’s the post from several years ago, describing my experience. Far from opposing opioids, I was thankful for them.

While walking my dog, I fell and broke my tibia and fibula (both bones of the lower leg). The break was obvious; I had to hold my foot to keep it from moving to an odd and painful angle. I sat on the ground, thinking, “Oh shit. This is going to hurt, and I’m going to have to go to the hospital emergency room on a Friday night to get a cast.”

And of course it did hurt. It was the worst pain I’ve ever had. I couldn’t get into a car to go to the hospital, since both hands were busy holding my foot. If I let go, my foot drooped to a sad angle. I wasn’t going anywhere without additional help. So my fiancé called 911.

First to arrive was a huge fire truck, with ladders, hoses, etc. One of three or four firemen took my blood pressure, asked me a few questions, and said EMS would be there soon. When EMS arrived, three or so more young men sprang from their vehicle. They asked the same questions all over again. At one point there were five or six burly young men who all responded to the 911 call, standing around me in a semi-circle. It felt like a bit of overkill, but I didn’t mind.

The worst part of my whole ordeal was when EMS workers tried to splint my leg with a device obviously meant for a much taller person. Putting the splint on caused my foot to move to an angle that God did not intend. The grinding of my bones made me sick to my stomach, to the dismay of EMS personnel. I’m told I gave my neighbors quite a show.

Once I finally got inside the ambulance, the EMS worker easily slid an IV into my arm and gave me a dose of fentanyl.

I have never taken any IV opioids, to my knowledge. Immediately, I felt hot all over, and then started weeping with relief. I wouldn’t say I felt euphoria, so much as a profound relief that the pain no longer hurt. That also sounds odd; I still had pain… but it didn’t bother me, and I felt like everything was going to be OK. In that moment, I had a better idea what my opioid-addicted patients describe when they tell me of the allure of opioids. Under the influence, I felt like nothing would bother me, physically or emotionally.

Then my eyes felt like they were spinning around in my head like pinballs, but I didn’t care about that, either. Then I got very chatty and talked nonstop to the hospital. I remember I told the EMS worker about how traffic lights looked like candy – lime, lemon, and cherry – so I may have been a little out of it.

The emergency room doctor ordered X-rays that showed the tib/fib fracture. I thought I would get a cast, and then go home. Wrong. The nurse told me I was being admitted for surgery on my broken leg. I wasn’t happy about this, especially since I hadn’t even talked to the orthopedic surgeon who would operate. I had questions. Why couldn’t I go home with a cast? What was he going to do at surgery, and why was it better than a cast?

So I stayed in the hospital that night, edgy about what surgery was proposed and full of questions. My leg hurt, but the emergency room staff had placed a plaster-type splint, or partial cast, on my leg, which kept the bones from moving around. As long as I kept it still and elevated, the pain wasn’t too bad. I had several shots of morphine through the night. I didn’t feel high from the morphine, but the shots put me to sleep, a good thing.

The surgeon came into my hospital room mid-morning, and talked to me about the advantages of having an intramedullary rod place through the center of my tibia to hold the broken sections together. This sounded extreme, but the surgeon said in “someone your age,” with simple casting the bones would take longer to heal. At my age, there was a relatively high rate of non-union, which would result in surgery at a later date anyway.

It took me longer to process the information than it should; I was stuck on that “someone your age” comment. I’m a young-looking 52, and finally realized I had to be much older than this young surgeon, who could have passed for twenty-five… Maaaaaybe the comment fit.

Anyway, I agreed to the surgery. Pre-op, the anesthesiologist gave me fentanyl, and again I had the feeling my eyeballs were spinning in circles and I got chatty. Then he must have given me something else that put me out completely, because the next thing I remember I was waking up back in my hospital room. I was upset when I didn’t see a cast, because I thought that meant I didn’t have the surgery. I didn’t know that an intramedullary rod takes the place of a cast…kind of like having a cast on the inside.

Since that surgery, I haven’t had much pain. I took my last morphine injection the night after surgery.
I’m no martyr. If I have pain, I want pain medication. The surgeon, knowing what I do for a living, asked me if I wanted to go home with any opioids. I said yes. I told him please prescribe what you would for anyone else. He prescribed twenty-five Percocet. I took two the morning after I got home, and they relieved the pain, but left me a little groggy and sleepy. I’d had enough of that in the hospital, and was eager to do some reading and writing, so that was the last dose of opioids for my broken leg. After making it a week with no opioids, I flushed the remaining twenty-three pills.

I had one bad spell after falling on my crutches, twisting the broken leg a little. The rod held my tibia in place, but the fibula hurt intensely for about twenty minutes before I was able to calm the pain with elevation, ice, and ibuprofen.

I think I’ve done well during my recovery from the broken leg. This surgery allowed me to heal much faster. It’s now almost six weeks since my surgery, and the above x-ray was taken today. My leg hurts only when I walk around. Ibuprofen and Tylenol have worked fine. I’ve been careful, especially during the first few weeks, to keep my leg elevated and use ice for swelling. I’m convinced elevation and ice helped a great deal.

This week I can walk with the help of a cane. It does hurt to walk, but it’s the kind of hurt that’s necessary to build back my muscles. If the pain gets too bad, I sit down and elevate my leg again.

I know I’m very lucky. The fracture happened in a place where help was readily available. It was less than thirty minutes from the time I broke my leg until I got a shot of a powerful opioid, fentanyl. This medication was a godsend to me.

I have health insurance, and could afford to get the surgery to help my leg heal quickly. My surgeon did a wonderful job, even if I do have underwear older than he is. I was able to take several weeks off work to keep my leg elevated for better healing and less pain. I have a loving fiancé who didn’t mind being my legs for a few weeks. Some people don’t have any of those things, so I’m very grateful.

What is the point of this blog, other than to blather on about my surgery and broken leg? It’s this: opioids are great when used the in the right situation. For acute pain, they are truly a blessing to mankind. But these drugs produce pleasure, and anyone can get addicted to that intensely good feeling.
Doctors have to find a balance between empathy and caution. Let’s not be stingy with opioids during acute medical situations with intense pain. Even in a patient with known addiction, opioids shouldn’t be withheld for an acutely painful medical situation, because that would be unethical.

But we can’t ignore the dangers of addiction, particularly if opioids are used for more than a few weeks. Even if we feel uncomfortable talking about addiction, we have to have those conversations with our patients. And please, fellow doctors, see patients with addictions as people with a treatable disease, who deserve the same respect as patients with any other disease. You don’t need to kick them out of your practice; you do need to refer them for help.

Addiction

aadrugs

Sometimes it’s frustrating to hear repeatedly on the news that opioid addiction is such a problem. It’s easy to feel helpless about the situation, and doubtful about how you can help. In this blog entry, I’m going to describe some very specific things you can do to reduce the impact of addiction on our society.

 If you are an addict, get help immediately. Many people have so much shame about becoming addicted that they’re mortified to seek help, fearing the stigma attached to addiction and to an admitted addict, so it takes tremendous courage to admit you have this problem. If you are getting medications from your doctor, tell her the truth. Tell her you are misusing the medicine and need help. She should be able to guide you to an appropriate addiction treatment center, to get an evaluation. At a good treatment center, you should be informed of all of your treatment options. This should include information on both medication-free treatment and medication-assisted treatment.

 If you are doctor shopping for prescriptions, stop it now. As more and more doctors use their states’ prescription monitoring database, sooner or later you will be discovered by one of your doctors. In my state of North Carolina, doctor shopping is a felony, because it’s considered using false pretenses to get a controlled substance. Instead, get treatment. If you’re selling these medications, stop it before you go to jail or kill someone.

 Get rid of all old medication in your cabinets, especially if they are controlled substances like opioid pain pills, sedatives, sleeping pills, or stimulants. According to a recent survey, most young people got their first opioid drug from friends or family. Many times, they took what they found in their parents’ medicine cabinets, or in their friends’ parents’ medicine cabinets. Some communities have regular “drug take back” days, where people bring unused medication for disposal. If you don’t have these in your community, you can wet the pills and mix them with coffee grounds or cat litter, and then throw them in the garbage. The coffee grounds and cat litter will deter addicts looking for medication. Don’t flush pills in the toilet, because there are fears the medication can enter our water supply. (Though I’ve always wondered about drug metabolites that are excreted in urine and feces…don’t they get into the water supply too?)

 Don’t share your medication, with anyone, even family. In this country, sharing medication is so common people don’t realize it’s a crime. Some people feel that if it’s their medicine, and they bought it, they have the right to do with it what they want. This isn’t true. Giving controlled substances to another person is a crime, and dangerous as well. Selling a controlled substance is even worse. Speak up to friends and family, letting them know you don’t think it’s OK for Aunt Bea to give Jimmy one of her Xanax pill because his nerves are bad today. Jimmy needs to see his own doctor.

 Give your children clear and consistent anti-drug messages. Don’t glamorize your own past drug use, including alcohol, by telling war stories. It should go without saying, though I’m going to say it: don’t use drugs with your kids, including alcohol and marijuana. Also, don’t err in the opposite direction, and exaggerate the harms of drug use, because you’ll lose credibility with your kids. Some may remember how the film “Reefer Madness” was mocked. Talk to your kids in an age-appropriate way about drugs and alcohol, even if they don’t appear to be listening.

 If you have a family member addicted to prescription medication, call their doctor to describe what you see. The doctor probably can’t discuss your relative’s treatment, unless given permission, but your doctor can accept information. Write a letter, and be specific with what you’ve witnessed. If your loved one runs out of medication early and then buys off the street, let the doctor know.

 If you feel your addicted loved one is seeing an unscrupulous doctor, report what you know to your state’s medical board. These professional organizations are the best equipped to review a doctor’s pattern of care, to decide if the doctor is prescribing inappropriately. Charts are often reviewed by other doctors who decide if the standard of care is being met.

 Underage drinking is serious. For each year you can postpone your child’s first experimental drug use, including alcohol, you reduce his risk of addiction by around five percent. (1) Don’t involve your kids in your own alcohol consumption; for example, don’t send you kids to the refrigerator to get you a beer. Don’t allow adolescents to drink in your house, fooling yourself with the idea of, “At least I know where they are.” Not only is it illegal, but it’s harmful.

 Don’t use drugs or alcohol to treat minor emotional discomfort, unless you have discussed it with your doctor. For example, don’t use pain pills to help you sleep. Don’t use the Xanax your doctor prescribed for your fear of flying to treat the sadness you feel from breaking up with a boyfriend. Try to get out of the mindset that there’s a pill for every bad feeling, and try to help your friends and family see this, too.

 See a doctor for the treatment of serious mental illness. Some mental disorders are so severe that they require medication. There are many non-addicting medications that treat depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders. Getting the appropriate treatment has been shown to decrease your risk of developing an addiction to alcohol and other drugs.

 Monitor your adolescent’s friends. Youngsters with friends who use drugs are more likely to begin using drugs. Of course, most youngsters who experiment with drugs and alcohol won’t develop addiction, but the younger experimentation begins, the more likely it is that addiction will develop. Older siblings can be a good or harmful influence.

1. Richard K. Ries, David A. Fiellin, Shannon C. Miller, and Richard Saitz, Principles of Addiction Medicine, 4th ed. (Philadelphia, Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, 2009) ch.99, pp1383-1389.

It’s That Time of Year! NSDUH is Here!

NSDUH past month illicit drug use 12 and older

Every year, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) is performed by a research group out of Raleigh, NC. The NSDUH report is released each fall, compiling data collected about drug and alcohol use in the nation and in individual states, from the previous year. This annual survey of around 70,000 people in the U.S. over age 12 also collects data on mental health in the U.S. This research information is collected from phone calls to individual households and is the primary source of data on the abuse of drug including alcohol in the U.S.

Since this survey is conducted on household members, some scientists say the data underestimates drug use since its methods exclude populations living in institutions such as prisons, hospitals and mental institutions. Such populations are known to have the highest rates of drug use and addiction. But the annual NSDUH report is still one of the best sources of information we have at present. This data can be evaluated for new trends of drug use and abuse, and can help direct funding toward problem areas. Researchers use this data to assess and monitor drug use, as well as the consequences.

This report contains data from 2012, and there were no big surprises.

23.9 million people in the U.S. over age 12 used illicit drugs over the past month. That’s around 9.2% of the population. By no means are all these people addicted, but they certainly are at risk for addiction. It’s not much different than the last NSDUH study. Just as in the past, the primary illicit drug used was marijuana, with 18.9 million people saying they used it during the previous 30 days.

nsdus2012psy

Psychotherapeutics were a distant second, with 6.8 million people in the U.S. over age 12 saying they’ve used these drugs non-medically over the past thirty days. This group of drugs contains opioids, stimulants, sedatives and tranquilizers. (Don’t ask me why sedatives and tranquilizers have two separate categories. It doesn’t make any sense to me either). In this survey, non-medical use is defined as use of a drug not in accordance with instructions from a physician. These are scary numbers, but again, it’s not significantly different from last year.

nsduh2012heroin<a

Overall nonmedical use of prescription opioids has remained fairly steady over the last ten years, but the above graph shows the steady increase in heroin use. This correlates with what I’ve been seeing in opioid treatment programs. This last week I admitted six people to an opioid treatment program in the mountains, and half were using heroin. They all described the heroin as being called “China white,” rather than the more usual black tar heroin that comes from Mexico and South America. This so-called China white has been seen in the Northeast, so I’ve been surprised to see addicts using it in rural mountain communities.

Read the study for yourself, since your tax dollars paid for it:http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2012SummNatFindDetTables/NationalFindings/NSDUHresults2012.htm