Archive for the ‘comorbidity’ Category

Avoiding Overdoses

August 31: Overdose Awareness Day

 

 

 

“I’m not gonna overdose. I know my limits.”

I really hate hearing these words. Usually patients say this in response to my concerns about their pattern of drug use while I’m prescribing methadone or buprenorphine. But many patients feel like they are the experts. They can’t imagine making a deadly mistake with their drug use. But I’ve heard this phrase, or something close to it, from at least five people who are now dead from overdoses.

I was reminded of this situation after reading an article in the latest issue of Journal of Addiction Medicine. Najman et al. wrote an article titled “When Knowledge and Experience Do Not Help: A Study of Nonfatal Drug Overdoses.”

The author of the study looked at nonfatal overdoses in Australia in 2013, where overdose deaths have risen steadily since 2007. In that country, unlike the U.S., heroin use is declining while pharmaceutical opioid misuse is rising.

This study looked at nonfatal overdoses in people who inject drugs. These people, identified by the needle and syringe exchange programs in Australia, were interviewed about the circumstances surrounding these overdoses, in order to get a better understanding of the risks. A total of 50 people were interviewed for this study.

Most of these people were male, middle-aged, single, and unemployed. Nearly all were smokers. Half had a diagnosis of liver disease and almost all reported a mental health diagnosis. Most injected pharmaceutical opioids, though some also injected heroin and methamphetamine. These were very experienced drug users, with an average of 21 years of intravenous drug use.

Surprisingly, more than half of the study subjects were in some form of treatment for substance use disorder. This finding is contrary to other studies, which have found being in treatment lowered the risk for overdose. Around 46% were in medication-assisted treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine. However, some of the overdoses happened on days that the person missed dosing for some reason, and substituted another opioid such as heroin or fentanyl. Thirty-two percent of study subjects dosed with either methadone or buprenorphine in the twenty-four hours prior to experiencing their overdose.

Most of these overdoses happened in private homes, and around half received some sort of folk remedy for overdose such as being slapped, put into cold water, or being shaken. Naloxone kits weren’t routinely being distributed at the time of this study.

When asked about the cause of their overdose, many the subjects said they were impaired by alcohol or benzodiazepines. Over half said they used benzodiazepines within twenty-four hours of their overdose. Of the 50 subjects, 64% said they had been prescribed anti-anxiety medications sometime in the year prior to overdose, and 38% said they’d been prescribed sleeping pills. Another 36% said they’d been prescribed some sort of tranquilizer in the year prior to overdose. I’m assuming many of the subjects were prescribed more than one of these groups of medications.

Alcohol was not as prominent as sedative medications as contributory cause of overdose; only 34% of subjects said they had some amount of alcohol in the twenty-four hours prior to their overdose.

Over a third of subjects had used fentanyl, a very powerful opioid, leading up to the overdose.

The authors of the study concluded that these experienced drug users were aware of common risks for overdose, yet drug intoxication from sedatives such as alcohol or benzodiazepines may have clouded the user’s thinking when injecting opioids. They also found that unexpected availability of drugs contributed to overdoses.

It’s an interesting study, and a little disturbing to me, particularly the data about overdoses in people who were enrolled in medication-assisted treatments. It does underline the importance of daily dosing of MAT, and the importance of avoiding alcohol and benzodiazepines in patients on MAT.

And if you didn’t know…August 31 is International Overdose Awareness Day.

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Methadone Overdose Deaths: First Two Weeks

Methadone

 

Methadone is a tricky drug to start, due to the narrow margin between therapeutic dose and fatal dose. Making it more difficult, people vary a great deal in the rate at which they metabolize methadone.  Some people have a methadone half -life as short as 15 hours, while others have half- lives as long as 60hours. The average is 22 hours. So even for people with a high tolerance to other opioids, increasing methadone too quickly can be deadly.

Methadone’s long half-life makes it good for a maintenance medication, since after stabilization, there’s not much fluctuation in the blood levels. However, the long half-life makes it more difficult to adjust the dose. The change I make in a patient’s dose today may not be fully experienced by the patient for five or more days.

The tolerance to the anti-pain effect of methadone builds faster than the tolerance to respiratory suppression, adding to the danger. When methadone is used inappropriately, patients may take more methadone to relieve pain, but by the time the pain is gone, they could easily have taken a methadone overdose.

All of this explains why the first two weeks of methadone maintenance treatment are the most dangerous. According to some studies, death rates for patients starting methadone at opioid treatment programs are actually higher during the first two weeks than when using illicit opioids. (1, 2)

Even so, it’s a risk worth taking, given the proven life-saving benefits of methadone (and buprenorphine) maintenance

Patient overdose during the first two weeks is a serious concern for doctors working at opioid treatment programs. We must do all we can to keep patients safe. It’s a fine line; if we start at too low of a dose or go up too slowly, we risk having our patients drop out of treatment. And if we increase the dose too quickly, it increases the risk of overdose…

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) recently updated their methadone induction guidelines. In past years, doctors working at opioid treatment programs (OTPs) tended to start patients at 30-40mg and increase the dose rather quickly. Now, the expert ASAM panel recommends a starting dose of 10-30mg. If that dose isn’t sufficient to suppress withdrawal, a second dose can be given after three hours, so long as the total dose is not greater than 40mg. The expert panel recommends increasing the dose no more quickly than every five days, and no more than five milligrams at a time.

Some patients are more susceptible to overdose, and physicians should consider lower methadone starting doses for these people:

-Age over 60

-Using sedating drugs like benzodiazepines

-Regularly consume alcohol

-Are on prescription medications which can interact with methadone

-Medically fragile patients, for example patients with coronary artery disease, morbid obesity, -chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or sleep apnea

-Have risk factors for prolonged QT interval, such as a recent heart attack, personal history of heart rhythm problems, or family history of heart disease

-Patients who have been abstinent from opioids for five or more days (e.g. recent incarceration, recent detoxification or hospitalization). These patients lose some of their tolerance and might be more prone to overdose with any opioid.

 

Interestingly, the degree of withdrawal that the patient has when entering treatment does not correlate with the dose of methadone they will need to get rid of withdrawal symptoms. In other words, one person in terrible withdrawal may need a smaller dose than another person with milder withdrawal. The degree of withdrawal that a patient feels is only partly due to opioid tolerance. Genetic makeup may be the reason why some people have more severe withdrawal than other people.

While I always ask my new patients how much opioid they have been using per day, that alone doesn’t determine methadone starting doses. There’s incomplete cross-tolerance between other opioids and methadone, meaning we can’t use the table of equianalgesic doses.

Last week I found an interesting article describing a large study of Canadian methadone patients, which will contribute even more to what we already know about risk during the first two weeks of methadone. This study showed which patient characteristics are associated with overdose death.

The study was done in Canada from 1994 until 2010, and covered over 43,000 patients enrolled in an opioid treatment program in those years. The study looked at all overdose deaths in this patient population and found 175 deaths deemed to be from opioids. These cases were matched with patients who entered treatment around the same time as the patient who died, creating a nested case-control study.

This study found, as expected, a higher degree of risk in the first few weeks on treatment. In this study, patients in the first two weeks of treatment were 16 times more likely to die in the first two weeks of treatment than any other time in treatment.

Psychotropic drugs were associated with a two-fold risk of overdose death overall, with antipsychotics associated with a 2.3-fold risk and benzodiazepines a 1.6-fold increased risk. Antidepressants were not associated with increased risk of overdose death. Alcohol use disorder diagnosis was also associated with a two-fold increase risk of overdose death.

Even more interesting, heart disease was associated with over five times increased risk of overdose death, and serious lung disorders (sleep apnea, COPD) were associated with a 1.7 times increase in overdose death.

This is a powerful study because it was so large.

This is information I can use. I’ve been stressing about patients whom I thought were at increased risk – those who use alcohol and benzodiazepines, and those with severe lung disease. While these patients are at higher risk, from this study it appears patients on anti-psychotics are at even higher risk. And I need to do a better job of getting patients to see primary care doctors, to screen for heart disease, which gave the highest risk of all.

As time goes on, I think we’ll get more information about which patients are at higher risk. Those patients need a higher degree of interaction with treatment center staff, and better coordination of care with mental health providers and primary care doctors. I know I plan to implement a system at the OTP where I work to make sure I see patients more often if they have the risk factors described.

Obviously any patient death is a terrible thing. Of course it’s worst for the family, but it also affects the treatment team. I feel badly for the families of those 175 patients in the Canadian study who died, but they gave us information that can hopefully help us provide better care for future patients.

 

  1. Caplehorn et al, “Mortality Associated with New South Wales Methadone Programs in 1994: Lives Lost and Saved,” Medical Journal of Australia, 1999 Feb 1;170(3):104-109
  2. Cousins et al, “Risks of drug-related mortality during periods of transition in methadone maintenance treatment: A cohort study,” Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, October 2011, Vol 41(3); pp252-260.
  3. Leece et al, “Predictors of opioid-related death during methadone therapy,” Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Oct 2015,

Smoked Heroin Leads to Early Lung Disease

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Heroin can be injected, snorted, or smoked. Researchers in England, noting an apparent increase in lung disease in people who smoke heroin, did a study that was just released late last year.

Walker et al, from Liverpool, England, studied 73 heroin smokers who had developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms before age 40. Researchers did pulmonary testing on these subjects and found significant abnormalities on pulmonary function tests, high-resolution CT scans, and oxygen diffusion capacity. (This last test shows how easily oxygen crosses from the lungs to the blood stream.)

These findings, building on other preliminary similar studies, shows that smoking heroin is associated with very early onset of COPD/emphysema.

Other studies have shown an associating between asthma attacks and smoked drugs, both with heroin and crack cocaine, but this study showed specific types are areas of lung changes which presumably are irreversible, in these very young patients. With cigarette smoking alone, significant COPD is rare before age 40, but all of these patients were younger than 40. Still, cigarette smoking could contribute to the severity of COPD.

Experts discussed the mechanism of lung damage in these heroin smokers. They postulated that heroin smokers tend to take deep breaths and hold the smoke in as long as possible, causing increased pressure in the thorax, which could cause or contribute to the lung damage.

Heroin smokers often put heroin on foil, then apply a heat source beneath and inhale the smoke. This is sometimes called “chasing the dragon.” Perhaps there’s something in the foil that when heated and inhaled, can cause lung disease. If that’s the case, then people who smoke pain pills could also be at risk for COPD from this practice.

Some experts point out that heroin burns at a much higher temperature than tobacco, and wonder if the higher temperature of the smoke causes this type of early lung damage.
For now we don’t know precisely why heroin smokers get early and probably irreversible lung damage, but physicians should be alert to this as a potential cause of early COPD, particularly in patients under age 40.

And here’s another good reason to stop using and get into recovery…

It’s That Time of Year! NSDUH is Here!

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Data from the 2014 survey of NSDUH (National Survey on Drug Use and Health) was released this month, as it is every year, in time to celebrate National Recovery Month of September: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-FRR1-2014/NSDUH-FRR1-2014.pdf

It’s mildly interesting reading; I saw no dramatic changes in the area of opioid addiction.

The number of non-medical users of prescription opioids remained roughly the same as last year, at 4.3 million people over the age of 12. That’s lower than in years 2001-2011. Overall, we may be seeing a slow trend downward. Also, there was a decline in users aged 18-25. Maybe current addicts are aging, and being counted in the next ago group 26 and older, but that next age group didn’t have a large increase this year or last. Maybe fewer youngsters are starting pain pill use, since they see the problems with opioid use in their older friends and acquaintances.

Heroin use is increasing, as has been discussed in this blog recently. However, according to NSDUH, though the total number of users increased, it only increased .1 percent. In total, an estimated 435,000 people over age 12 in the U.S. are current heroin users. I do suspect the upward trend will be more dramatic in future years, unfortunately.

The number of current marijuana users age 12 and older continued to gradually increase, with 22.2 million current users of marijuana and hashish. This is about 8.4% of the U.S. population over age 12. That number is not significantly higher than in 2013.

How accurate is NSDUH data? If anything, it likely underestimates the number of drug users. It surveys people living in households, at fixed addresses. It does not survey the homeless or those in jails, hospitals or other institutions. It also does not survey military personnel. People in some of these groups, particularly the homeless and the imprisoned, have high rates of drug addiction, so NSDUH is probably underestimating the prevalence of addiction.

However, this is the best yearly study we have available in the U.S.

The Benzo Conversation

Glass head full of pills

Not all of my patient interactions are easy. One of my colleagues, after reading my blog, remarked, “It sounds like you have really easy patients.” While that’s true for the most part, of course there are more difficult patients, as in any practice. Some patients, eager to get into treatment to stop opioid addiction, may not be at all ready to stop other drugs of addiction. That’s not a deal-breaker for me, unless those drugs could be fatal when mixed with methadone or buprenorphine. This means the use of alcohol, benzodiazepines, and sedatives of other kinds must be discussed in detail.

I’ve noticed a conversational merry-go-round that I call “the benzo conversation.” I’ve had versions of this conversation more times than I can remember.

This conversation occurs during my initial assessment of a new patient presenting for medication-assisted treatment. I always look on my state’s prescription monitoring program for each new patient on the day of admission. If they have prescriptions for benzodiazepines (like Xanax, Valium, or clonazepam), or other sedatives (Soma, Ambien, etc.) I need information about the pattern of use. Is my patient taking his prescribed daily dose? Is he then physically dependent on benzodiazepines? Is he selling them? Is he giving part of the prescription away, and taking the rest? Does he binge on benzos for the first few weeks of the month, and then run out for several weeks? Or is he bartering the benzos for opioids, and not taking any of them, despite filling a large prescription each month?

I really don’t care if the patient is breaking the law or not; I just want to get the complete picture of my patient’s health status.

Following is a typical conversation with a new patient whom I will call “Bob.”

Bob sought admission to our methadone maintenance treatment program for his opioid addiction. He had snorted pain pills for six years, and wanted help. He had little if any denial about his opioid addiction. He denied taking any prescription medications, saying he got all his opioids off the street, used no other drugs or medications, and had no other medical problems.

However, when I checked his name on my state’s controlled prescription monitoring program, he was filling a prescription for Xanax 2mg, ninety per month, from a local Dr. Feelgood. This prescription had been filled every month for the last four years. My patient’s admission urine drug screen also tested positive for benzodiazepines.

As part of my initial history and physical, I asked him about the Xanax prescription. I explained to Bob that benzos have the potential to cause a fatal overdose when mixed with opioids. I told him that benzos are especially risky with methadone, and I was concerned about his use of them.

Bob said, “Oh, I don’t use benzos now. I haven’t used Xanax for years.
“But you’ve been prescribed it every month and picked up the last prescription of ninety pills just two weeks ago.”
“Yes, but I don’t take them. I quit them long ago.”
“And you do have benzos in the urine sample you gave us.”
“Well, that’s probably from a little piece of Valium I used four days ago.”
“Ummm…, Valium’s also a benzo, in the same family as Xanax, so when you say you’ve stopped, that doesn’t make sense to me.…”
“As I told you, I don’t take benzos anymore.”
“But four days ago is pretty recent.”
“No,” he said, getting a little worked up. “As I’ve already told you, I stopped benzos years ago!”
“So what do you do with the Xanax pills you pick up at the pharmacy every month?”
“I don’t know. They’re in the house somewhere. But I don’t take them.”
“So you have…how many bottles do you have at home?”
“Bunches, I don’t know.”
I could tell I was annoying him, but this as an important clinical issue, so I pushed on.
“Would you be willing to bring all those bottles in tomorrow so the nurse can watch you dispose of them?”
He sighed deeply, annoyed by my questions. “Yes. I suppose I can. Now can I get my dose?”
“No, I’ll leave an order for you to be able to start tomorrow after you bring in the medication to dispose, since you tell me you haven’t taken them. I worry about a fatal overdose if methadone were combined with all that Xanax you have at home.”
Now he was mad. “I don’t have any Xanax at home! I’m not going to overdose! I know what I’m doing.”
“Will you give me permission to call the doctor prescribing the Xanax, so we can talk about your entry into treatment here? Maybe your doctor would be willing to taper your dose so that we can make it safer for you to be in treatment with us.”
“No! I don’t want everybody to know my business. My doctor is friends with my ex-wife and if she finds out I’m being treated for addiction, she’ll cause trouble. He can’t find out.”
“I’m sorry, but that’s a deal-breaker for me. I’m not going to prescribe methadone for you unless I can talk to your other doctor. It’s just too risky. All of your doctors need to know all medications that you’re on.”
“So you’re telling me to go back out there and use drugs? That I can’t get help unless my ex-wife finds out I’m an addict?” The veins in his neck were standing out.
“No. I’m not telling you to use drugs. I’m telling you…
“I want my money back, since I’m gonna have to go buy dope again ‘cause you won’t help me. It’s just not right. I came here to get help.” He stalked off toward the receptionist, where I heard him demanding his money back, despite the hour he spent with a counselor and the time spent with me in an evaluation. (For some reason, patients who don’t get admitted to the program don’t feel they should have to pay for their evaluation)

This was a difficult, tense conversation, and one I’ve had too many times to count. This patient wasn’t a bad guy, but he was not ready to address his benzodiazepine use. The outcome wasn’t what I’d hoped, and this patient didn’t come into treatment.

There’s no way I could know what this patient was doing with his benzodiazepine prescription. I couldn’t tell if this patient was telling the truth, in denial, or lying. Without being able to talk to his prescribing doctor, I wasn’t willing to start medication-assisted treatment. This didn’t mean he didn’t need treatment, only that perhaps a different form of treatment will be safer for him. I wish I could have given him information about other treatments, but he left too quickly and too angrily.

Sometimes patients tell me I’m violating their privacy by looking at their information on the prescription monitoring database. I tell them I don’t see it that was at all, since they are asking me to prescribe a medication that could have a fatal interaction with other medications. Not only is it my business, it’s my responsibility.

Some doctors would fault me for not admitting this patient despite his refusal to allow me to talk to his prescribing doctor, given the increased risk of death for patients in active opioid addiction who are not in any treatment. But I would feel terrible if I’d admitted this patient and he died during the first few weeks of a methadone/benzodiazepine overdose. Either way, there’s a lot at stake, and I feel stress about these decisions.

Insomnia

aainsomnia

Insomnia is defined as a sleep disorder which makes it difficult to get to sleep or stay asleep. Insomnia can come & go for periods of time, or can be a chronic problem. Not sleeping well can make us less able to handle the stresses of the next day, and can severely affect the quality of our lives.

Insomnia afflicts many patients in recovery, including those on medication assisted treatment with buprenorphine and methadone. Insomnia can occur for many reasons: the brain may be adjusting to life without the chemical ups & downs of addicted life, or because the patient had insomnia even before the addiction started. Physical health problems (chronic pain, thyroid disease, and menopause to name but a few) can cause insomnia or make it worse, as can mental illnesses like anxiety and mood disorders.

Active addiction can destroy normal sleep-wake cycles. Addictive chemicals disrupt the structure and function of the brain, and often people in active addiction become accustomed to passing out rather than falling asleep. It can be difficult to re-learn how to get to sleep naturally.

Many U.S. citizens, and not only addicts, have become “chemical copers.” We have the idea that every problem can and should be fixed with medication. But with insomnia, sleep hygiene is the best first option, and medication can be used if sleep hygiene doesn’t work.

Sleep hygiene, which sounds it means washing behind your ears at bedtime, really refers to habits that help us get satisfactory sleep. Most are common sense ideas, and they can really make a big difference. Here are some of these ideas:

1. Go to bed at the same time and wake at the same time every day, even on weekends.
If it’s at all possible, don’t go to bed later or sleep later on weekend days. Get your body into the habit of keeping a regular sleep/wake cycle. You will fall asleep more easily with a fixed bed time.
Besides making your feel better because you’ll get more regular sleep, this practice has other benefits. For example, people with migraine and tension headaches have fewer pain episodes with regular sleep/wake times. Keeping regular sleeping hours is also highly recommended for patients with bipolar disorder, as it can help with mood swings.

2. Avoid caffeine late in the day. For some people, drinking caffeine in the late afternoon can affect them up to six hours later. To be sure, cut off caffeine at least eight hours before you want to sleep. Caffeine doesn’t affect everyone to this degree, but unless you know for sure, try to limit late-day caffeine. If you consume energy drinks, consider cutting back or stopping them.

3. Make sure your bed is comfortable and your room as free from distractions as possible. Pets and rowdy bed partners may need to sleep in other areas. Make sure the room temperature is conducive to sleep and there’s no noise or light that may interrupt sleep. Keeping the television on for background noise isn’t a good idea and can prevent you from getting to the deeper levels of sleep.

4. Don’t set your alarm for earlier than you need to. Many of us like to do this so we can hit snooze a few times. However, the most beneficial sleep, REM sleep, comes at the end of the night, and we are depriving ourselves of REM sleep by hitting the snooze button a few times before getting out of bed for good.

5. Have a bedtime ritual. Have things you do each night before going to bed that relax you and put you in a mindset to sleep. This could be a series of ablutions like brushing your teeth, flossing, or taking a warm bath. Other people may prefer doing prayer or meditation to quiet the mind, or reading.

6. Don’t nap during the day to catch up on sleep. More than anything else, napping will keep you from sleeping at night.

This is a tough one for me, since napping has long been one of my hobbies. Because I think of a good nap as one of life’s great joys, on some days I’m willing to risk not being able to get to sleep at night and take the nap anyway.

7. Don’t use alcohol to help you sleep. While alcohol does cause faster sleep onset, it also shortens the sleep cycle, causing us to wake earlier, and robs us of the important REM sleep. Over long term, alcohol can greatly interfere with your sleep cycle.

8. Only use your bed for sleep. OK, for sex too. But don’t live in your bed so that you become accustomed to eating, watching television, and working on the computer in bed. Your mind should associate bed with sleep, and not these waking activities.

9. Exercise each day. More than most other suggestions, this one can help you more than you expect. Even a small amount of exercise can have surprisingly good benefits. Don’t exercise too close to bedtime, since exercise can have a stimulating effect.

Sometimes people in early recovery find they want to sleep more than usual. This can be part of your physical recovery, and I think it’s best to listen to your body and allow yourself extra sleep time without feeling guilty. However, some mood disorders also make people want to “take to the bed” during times of stress and negative emotion. This latter situation may need medication if it continues or interferes with your life.

If you try all these sleep hygiene measures and you still can’t sleep, talk to your doctor about a safe medication for sleep. I’ll write more about medications in a later blog.

Is Impotence on the Rise in Opioid Users?

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According to a recent study, long-acting opioids are nearly five times more likely to suppress testosterone levels than short-acting opioids.

Over the last few years, we’ve seen a surge in data that couples opioid use with lowered male testosterone levels. We know the use of opioids can lead to hypogonadism, a condition of lowered sex hormone production. In males, lowered testosterone levels can lead to fatigue, depression, and even osteoporosis and obesity. Some studies suggest this hypogonadism is also associated with lowered pain tolerance.

In previous studies, opioid users were lumped together, but this recent study compared the testosterone levels of patients taking long-acting opioids with patients taking short acting opioids.

Dr. Andrea Rubinstein presented data at the annual American Academy of Pain Medicine meeting. Her study compared 81 male patients taking opioids for at least three months. Those in the long-acting opioid group included patients prescribed methadone, buprenorphine (Subutex, Suboxone), sustained-release medications in patch form, such as morphine and fentanyl, and sustained-release medications like OxyContin (taken whole as intended with the coating not removed). These patients were compared with those on short acting opioid like immediate-release oxycodone and hydrocodone.

The patients on the long acting opioid were nearly five times more likely to have low testosterone levels than patients on the short acting opioids. The age of the patient and the total daily dose did not appear to affect the risk of low testosterone.

It’s possible that short acting opioids give more fluctuation in serum opioid levels, and thus less likely to suppress hormonal function.

This is not great news for those of us who treat opioid addiction. We use long-acting opioids like methadone and buprenorphine precisely because they are long-acting, and give a steady blood levels. Their long action in the body means they can be dosed once a day (usually) and still relieve all opioid withdrawal symptoms. The relief from opioid withdrawal frees the patient to focus on making important life changes. With short-acting opioids, most addicts feel a euphoric high, followed several hours later by withdrawal. This drives them to seek opioid drugs as often as every six hours. It’s hard to maintain a normal life when seeking pursuing opioids three or four times per day. Simply staying out of withdrawal becomes the opioid addict’s full time job. Short acting opioids may be better for my patients’ testosterone levels, but not good for their disease off addiction.

So what should I do with this data about hypogonadism in my practice?

I think I should be more diligent about monitoring my patients for symptoms of low libido. It’s important to ask male patients about sexual difficulties because sometimes they are embarrassed to mention them. If patients have no symptoms of hypogonadism, they probably don’t need further testing. If patients do have symptoms, I’ll ask them to see their family doctors for a work-up, because that’s something that can’t be treated at the opioid treatment programs where I work. Testosterone can be supplemented with gel or intramuscular injections, and testosterone levels need to be monitored, as well as cholesterol levels.

I’ve had previous patients who object to testosterone supplementation because they felt they were treating a side effect from one medication with a second medication. While this is true, the only other option is tapering off methadone or buprenorphine, or cutting down their dose. This also has risks, as opioid addiction is a life-threatening illness. If a patient wants completely off medication, he should have an inpatient treatment lined up as soon as his dose is low enough for admission.

What about women on medication-assisted treatments with low sex drive? Women weren’t included in this study, but yes, we know their hormones are also affected by opioids. Testosterone may help women recover their sex drive, but it has serious side effects and hasn’t been proven to be safe in the long term for women. For females who report sexual dysfunction on long-acting opioids, I will continue to refer them to their gynecologists.

As usual, the benefits of long-acting opioids must be balanced against their risks.