Archive for the ‘injecting suboxone’ Category

Advice for New Prescribers

 

 

 

The medical care providers of this nation are being encouraged get training necessary to prescribe buprenorphine products (brand names Suboxone, Zubsolv, Bunavail, Sublocade, and the generics) for the treatment of opioid use disorder in their patients. We need more good prescribers, because even after twenty years into this opioid situation, only about twenty percent of patients who need treatment can get it.

I’ve written on this topic a few times in the past, but this blog entry will contain some advice directed to new prescribers of buprenorphine products. Hopefully it will help them have good experiences prescribing medication-assisted treatment.

Here are some ideas that work for me at my office:

Treat the patient with opioid use disorder with the same attitude and compassion that you would for any other patient with a potentially fatal chronic illness. If you can’t do that, then don’t treat patients with substance use disorders. Patients detect negative attitudes such as distain and dislike even when those attitudes are communicated non-verbally. For whatever reason, if you can’t put judgment aside, then work on your own issues before you attempt to treat suffering people trying to get well.

Patients will resent a physician with a bad attitude. That will contaminate the relationship with predictable results.

For example, I talked to one physician who had his waiver to prescribe buprenorphine from an office setting. I asked him why he wasn’t using his waiver to treat patients, since there were so many in our community that needed help.

He told me the visits with the first two patients went poorly. He said both these patients threatened his life and the lives of his family members. After that, he decided not to risk treating anyone with opioid use disorder.

I was shocked. I’ve never, in the thirteen years I’ve been prescribing from an office practice, had any patient threaten my life, though I’ve made some angry at me. I had to wonder what kind of bedside manner this doctor had, for his first two patients to want to kill him. That sounds like I’m blaming the doctor, and maybe I am, but his experience was so contrary to my own that I had to wonder what was going on. I suspect his patients didn’t feel respected by him.

I’ve had one patient threaten me with bodily harm, but that was at an opioid treatment program in Gastonia, NC, more than a decade ago. The patient was an avowed KKK member, tall and large, with tattoos of hate groups on his muscular arms. I might have been worried, except at the time he threatened me, he was so impaired on benzos that I could have pushed him over with a finger. I’d just told him he couldn’t dose with methadone that day, due to impairment. The next week, he greeted when we passed in the hall. I assume he had been in a blackout from his benzodiazepine ingestion the week before and didn’t remember our previous interaction.

Be clear with your patients about your expectations. At the first visit, I sit with the patient and go over a patient agreement form. I adapted it from a SAMHSA website where you can find helpful forms, tools, and ideas.

https://pcssnow.org/resources/clinical-tools/

https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/training-resources/publications

In that agreement, I outline my expectations. I have paragraphs indicating that disruptive or violent behavior won’t be tolerated and are grounds for immediate dismissal from my practice. In thirteen years, I’ve never had one patient become rowdy or disruptive. Having said that, I do realize other prescribers have had different experiences.

I ask patients to keep and be on time for appointments, and if they don’t show up and don’t call, they will be charged for the missed visit. I tell patients I won’t call in prescriptions if they miss a visit. Having said that, I’m also flexible enough to know that things do come up – cars break down, traffic jams occur, etc. In the winter, travel can be treacherous, so that’s another factor to be dealt with. All I ask is that the patients communicate problems early so we can find a reasonable solution.

Patients who miss appointments, don’t call, and won’t answer our calls to find out what’s going on will have problems at my practice. It may or may not be their fault, but if it doesn’t work out they will need to find a new provider.

My agreement also says I won’t “fire” a patient before I talk to them face-to-face. Patients tell me they’ve been dismissed by a practice by letter, for some issue or another. I think that’s cowardly, and disrespectful to the patient. If there’s a reason I feel I can no longer to continue treatment as we are, I owe it to the patient to tell them exactly what the problem is. Sometimes we can find solutions short of termination and sometimes we can’t. At least the patient will know I respect them enough to talk to them, and they will know the basis of my decision. They will also get a referral to a new provider, or at least a recommendation.

Be careful with patient selection and try to match the patient with the best level of care.

Not every patient will do well in an office-based setting. For example, if a patient has been using buprenorphine products illicitly by insufflation or injection, that patient probably is best treated in an opioid treatment program, where observed dosing is done.

Most patients need to be on the combination products buprenorphine/naloxone. Adverse reactions do occur with the monoproduct, but they are rare, and drug diversion is not. If a new patient needs the monoproduct, I refer them to an opioid treatment program where they can be properly observed.

If that patient has been treated in another office-based setting with medical records that support their progress and compliance on the monoproduct, my recommendation would be different. Many factors influence my treatment decisions, so I need all the information I can get to make the best decisions.

This leads me to my next recommendation: get old records. Make the effort to get records from a previous practice. Sometimes patients, to curry favor with a new prescriber, will tell tales about how awful their last prescriber was. That may be true…or there may be more to the story, so get records to get a better idea of what happened at the last practice.

Don’t falsify your own records. It’s unethical and probably illegal to bill for services you document but don’t provide. To get higher insurance reimbursements, physicians sometimes chart long review of systems and/or physical exams than were performed. This is called “up-billing.” I suspect up-billing when I see records with four pages of single-spaced type for each visit, but then notice the same four pages for each monthly visit, with no changes.

I blogged before about a patient whose records recorded an exam saying “consistent with eight-month pregnancy” for every monthly visit for over a year. Yeah…kind of suspicious…using that cut-and-paste feature, I think.

If you do telemedicine, make sure you have some sort of medical personnel on site with the patient to look for physical finding you may miss with telecommunications. I just admitted a patient to our opioid treatment program who had been on Suboxone for six months from a provider he only saw online. This patient was injecting his medication, but his prescriber couldn’t see it. His most prominent tracks were on the side of his neck, which could be hidden with a high collar. Obviously, this could have ended in disaster had the patient not realized he needed a higher level of care.

Be careful about lab schemes. If a laboratory diagnostic service is charging patients $500 for one drug screen, it’s probably a scam. In past years, these organization popped up like mushrooms in manure, saying they could do extensive lab testing for all patients, but only charge those with insurance. Uninsured would get free testing.

As it turns out, some of those companies charged outrageous fees to the insurance companies, including Medicaid and Medicare, for expensive and unnecessary testing, in get-rich-quick schemes. Here’s a link to an article that explains how this works:

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/report-urine-based-drug-tests-helping-some-doctors-soak-profits

Good providers don’t want to sully their name by associating with shady laboratory service providers. Physicians can do good point-of-care testing on site for $10 or less. Sometimes patients need more extensive testing, and this can be decided on a case-by-case basis rather than testing every patient for dozens of drugs that aren’t commonly used in the community where you practice.

Be aware of what drugs are trending in your area and make sure they are included in your drug testing protocol. In the past, heroin was rare in rural areas, but that’s changed. As I’ve discussed on this blog, heroin frequently contains fentanyl, a much more powerful opioid that’s responsible for many overdose deaths.

Ask your new patients what drugs are being used in your community. They can be great sources of information, as can local addiction medicine educational conferences, and your local law enforcement officials.

Make friends with the medical director at your local opioid treatment program. Most physician medical directors at opioid treatment programs are happy to work collaboratively with office-based providers. We share patients all the time and need to do what’s best for the patient. We don’t need to look at each other as competitors, because there are more than enough patients for everyone, unfortunately. Let’s work together to get people into treatment, and to match the patient with the right level of care.

It can be a relief for an office-based provider to know they have a facility willing to deliver a higher level of care when necessary. Sometimes the patient may need inpatient treatment, but at other times it might be an opioid treatment program, where the patient may come daily for dosing and oversight.

Again, some patients, in an effort to curry favor with a new prescriber, may talk disparagingly about another treatment facility, so don’t take a patient’s word that an opioid treatment program does an awful job.

Decades ago in my previous life as a primary care physician, I learned that the new patient who tells me how wonderful I am compared to their last terrible doctor will soon be saying the same thing to another new doctor, about how terrible I am. I know there are terrible doctors, but there are also some patients that can’t be pleased no matter how good the physician.

Finally, get involved with organizations that can help you. You don’t need to re-invent the wheel; as I mentioned above, help is available from several sources.

Go to the SAMHSA website mentioned above and you will find helpful resources. Or you can go to the American Society of Addiction Medicine website for information: https://www.asam.org/  You may decide to go to one of their excellent conferences.

Go to the Providers’ Clinical Support System (PCSS) website and search their educational offerings at https://pcssnow.org/ They have archived webinars, mentoring programs, and other great things available.

If you work in North Carolina, there is the UNC ECHO program, which offers live teleconferences three days per week on issues surrounding medication-assisted treatment of patients in the office setting. You can hear cases presented and listen to input from experts and other prescribers, while getting free (yes I said free) CME hours. Once involved, you can present your own difficult cases to get help with difficult patient situations. You can go to their website at: https://echo.unc.edu/ or leave me a comment with your email and I can connect you to the organization.

It can be difficult to persuade new prescribers that treating patients with opioid use disorder is rewarding and fun. I became a physician because I wanted to help people, sappy as that sounds. I didn’t feel the sense of satisfaction during the decade I worked in primary care, for whatever reason, that I now feel working in the field of Addiction Medicine.

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Treatment Implications for Intravenous Buprenorphine Use

Hokey Pokey

 

 

During the admission of new patients for opioid use disorder treatment, I ask about prior use of all drugs. I include the medications we use for treatment. I’ve done this since I started working at opioid treatment programs (OTPs) fifteen years ago.

Over the last few years, more patients say they’ve used illicit buprenorphine in the past. At first, I saw patients who were using it sublingually (under the tongue), as recommended, though still illicitly. Most of them wanted to see if this medication would work for them before they committed to the time and expense of entering a treatment program.

Over the past six months, I’m seeing more and more new patients who say they’re using buprenorphine intravenously. This past month, I’d estimate that a fourth of the patients who use buprenorphine illicitly are injecting it. Only a few said they snort buprenorphine.

This presents a big wrinkle to the treatment process.

I see why people use intravenous buprenorphine. It has low sublingual bioavailability, at around thirty percent. That means injecting two or three milligrams gives the same blood level as eight milligrams sublingually. In the short term, people injecting buprenorphine feel like it saves them money. In the long term, I’m certain it will cost more than they can imagine.

Buprenorphine tablets and films were not designed to be injected. Pills and films have fillers in them, and they aren’t sterile. Heating a mixture prior to injection will kill off some of the bacteria, so that’s a harm reduction practice. Using a filter can remove some of the particulate matter, also reducing the potential for harm. However, heat and filters can’t remove all the risk of injecting.

People on the internet insist the bioavailability of snorted buprenorphine is higher than sublingual use, but I doubt that. Either way, you bypass the liver because it crosses to the bloodstream via the veins of the nose or tongue. Plus, alkaline environments increase absorption and bioavailability for this drug, and the mouth is more alkaline than the nose.

Of course there is another reason people with opioid use disorder inject or snort their medication. Their brains associate the act of injecting or snorting with pleasure and euphoria, and can become addicted to the process and feeling of both means of ingestion.

Due to the ceiling on buprenorphine’s opioid effect, it is… arguably… one of the safest opioids a person could inject. But intravenous use is never safe.

Here’s only a partial list of complications from intravenous drug use:

  1. Overdose resulting in death, brain damage from low oxygen, stroke or heart attack from prolonged low oxygen
  2. Pulmonary edema (lungs fill with fluid)
  3. Skin abscesses and cellulitis
  4. Endocarditis (infection of heart valve that is life-threatening)
  5. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot)
  6. Septic thrombophlebitis (infected blood clot)
  7. Contracting infections: HIV, Hep C or B
  8. Bacterial infections and abscesses in weird places like the spine, brain, joints, spleen, muscles, or eye
  9. Necrotizing fasciitis – rapid, “flesh- eating” infection, also botulism
  10. Pneumonia
  11. Septic emboli – when infected clots break off and go to the lungs, brain from infected heart valves
  12. Fungal blood/eye infections – (seen frequently when pills mixed with saliva are injected)

I have seen patients with every one of these complications. Most of them were in the distant past, when I was an Internal Medicine resident during the late 1980’s, but not all of them. Over the past six months, I’ve seen two patients with spinal abscesses from injecting drugs, though not necessarily buprenorphine.

The last time I posted about intravenous use of buprenorphine (November 2015), Dr. Wartenberg M.D. (pioneer in the addiction treatment field) wrote about the mitochondrial disease, which has caused liver failure, in European IV buprenorphine drug users. This disorder is specific to buprenorphine

So what are the treatment implications for a new patient who has injected buprenorphine?

First of all, these patients aren’t appropriate for office-based practices, even if the physician plans to prescribe the combination product with buprenorphine/naloxone. Clearly there are some patients who inject combination products and monoproducts. Granted, it’s less common, but it still occurs. There’s usually not enough oversight available at office-based practices to treat more complicated patients. I think they should be referred to opioid treatment programs, where they can be offered treatment with methadone.

What if the patient refuses methadone for some reason, or their risk with methadone is at too high from a medical view? Should patients with a history of injecting buprenorphine ever be treated with buprenorphine?

I think they can be – with great caution and daily dosing, on-site at the opioid treatment program.

At our OTP, we ask all buprenorphine patients to sit in a designated area while their dose dissolves. It usually takes around ten minutes, and they are watched by program personnel. Before they leave, each buprenorphine patient shows one of the staff their mouth, to show the medication is completely dissolved. It does feel a little “police-y” but we had a high incidence of diversion until we started this close observation.

If a patient tries to spit out their medication, they meet with me. I’m rarely willing to continue to prescribe buprenorphine if it appears they are trying to divert their medication. I meet with the patient and we discuss the option of methadone. If they refuse methadone, we try to refer them to another form of treatment.

If a patient with a history of injecting buprenorphine wants treatment with buprenorphine, I tell him I’m willing to give it a try, but that he can’t expect take home doses for a very long time, after months of observed dosing and stability. So far, this approach seems to be working. These patients are getting counseling, and haven’t attempted to divert their medication, so far as we can see. I’ve checked these patients for track marks, which in all cases appear to be healing, with no new marks.

When/if to grant these patients take homes remains a huge question. I don’t want to unduly burden a patient by insisting he must come every day forever, but I also don’t want to give the patient take home doses that could lead to a relapse back to intravenous use.

Buprenorphine: Current Practices

NCSAM

I just got back from the NC Society of Addiction Medicine annual conference. (Yes, I’ve been to several conferences lately.) One of the sessions I attended was a lively discussion of the current practices in office-based prescribing of buprenorphine, for opioid addiction.

The session was run by two experienced, knowledgeable addictionologists, who mediated topics and shepherded the dialogue. One physician works in North Carolina and the other in Tennessee. The room was packed with at least fifty people, most of us doctors who prescribe buprenorphine for addiction.

Deliberations were collegial but we didn’t agree on all issues, of course. Dissenting opinions were respected and debated.

The first topic I can recall was about how often buprenorphine patients need to be seen. Most practitioners agreed that new patients needed to be seen at least weekly initially. As stability develops, we gradually extend the time between visits to one month. One doctor opined that no patient should be allowed to go any more than one month between physician visits. When the moderator asked if anyone disagreed, I raised my hand, and the moderator asked me to explain.

With some trepidation, I told the audience that I had a super-stable group of patients in my practice. I inherited most of them from another physician who was one of the first in the area to prescribe buprenorphine. This group of patients all have over five years of stable and relapse-free recovery. A few have been in stable recovery for nearly ten years. These people work, and have happy and productive lives.

So yes, I do allow these patients to go two months between visits.

No one booed or hissed me, but I got the feeling I’m doing something with my patients outside the realm of normal for most doctors prescribing buprenorphine. Thankfully, the moderator made the point that we should use our clinical judgment and adjust treatment to best fit each situation, which made me feel better.

I was mulling this over later, and maybe I do have an unusual group of patients, who have been stable on MAT for so long. Some of these patients elected to stay on sublingual buprenorphine because they are doing so well on it, and they fear relapse if they taper off of it. Others plan to stay on buprenorphine because they developed addiction as a complication of chronic pain treatment. Happily, the buprenorphine works as well for their pain as it does for their addiction, so we get the two birds with the one stone.

There’s another unusual thing about these super-stable patients: almost all of them are deeply involved in 12-step recovery. Many were in Alcoholics Anonymous prior to their opioid addiction. They developed addiction to opioid pain pills after receiving prescription opioids for an acute or chronic pain condition. Once they started on buprenorphine to treat the opioid addiction, they continued going to Alcoholics Anonymous (a few go to Narcotics Anonymous).. Other patients didn’t start going to AA until after they entered MAT on buprenorphine.

I’ve had many people write comments to my blog, furious when I even mention 12-step recovery and MAT in the same sentence. But I have living proof in my practice of multiple patients on medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction who have been able to make 12-step programs work for them.

Getting back to the conference…we spent much time discussing the monoproduct buprenorphine versus the combination product buprenorphine/naloxone. All of us agreed there’s a need for caution with prospective patients who insist they can take only the monoproduct (this is the equivalent of the brand name Subutex), because it does have a higher street value than the combination product.

Of course, there are people who inject the combination product (Suboxone film, Zubsolv, etc.), but overall, people seeking to inject buprenorphine are much more likely to prefer plain buprenorphine. Black market prices are higher for the monoproduct than the combination product, underscoring the preference for monoproduct.

One outspoken doctor said the monoproduct should rarely if ever be prescribed. Another doctor echoed my feelings on the matter when he said something to the effect that some patients really do have a bad reaction to the naloxone in the combination products, and if we are cautious, we can prescribe the monoproduct. However, the general opinion was that financial reasons weren’t sufficient to take the risk of prescribing the monoproduct.

I disagree with that, but kept quiet, already feeling like maybe I’m a bit too liberal.

I have had patients, stable on a buprenorphine combination product (usually brand name Suboxone films), who suddenly lost their health insurance. If such patients had negative drug screens for years, and no history of intravenous use, I switched them to the generic monoproduct because it’s the cheapest buprenorphine product on the market. These patients could not have stayed in treatment if I’d made them stay on the much more expensive brand names. Most of those patients prefer the films, and when they got new insurance, asked to switch back to the films.

I did not suspect these patients would sell their medication for profit. You have to know them, but these patients had stable jobs and no leanings toward criminality. And I am by no means a gullible person.

Since then, a generic combination product came onto the market. Still more expensive than the monoproduct, it’s less expensive than all the name brands.

Next we discussed how to deal with patients who say they are allergic to naloxone, and thus can’t take the combination product (Suboxone, Zubsolv) but only the monoproduct (Subutex).. Patients usually don’t mean an actual allergy, but rather intolerance to naloxone. These patients report headache, nausea, etc. when they ask their physician to prescribe the monoproduct. Of course, this raises suspicion with physicians that such patients plan to misuse the medication by injecting or snorting.

Should physicians just accept what patients say at face value, or should we say sorry, I only prescribe buprenorphine in combination with naloxone? After all, there’s no way to “prove” a headache or nausea. There’s no test we can order that will give any useful information. One doctor said he sent such patients to a neurologist for evaluation of the headache, or to a gastroenterologist to decide the cause of nausea. He says most patients fail to follow through, and so he weeds such prospective patients out of his practice that way.

An audience member suitably questioned this habit, asking how could a specialist be expected to determine if a medication caused headache or nausea? I think it’s kind of a sneaky way to get rid of patients who want buprenorphine monoproduct.

I have the same fears when fielding new calls from prospective patients. I’ve instructed my patient contact representative (who is also my office’s licensed professional counselor, after-hours contact person, pharmacy liaison, licensed clinical addiction specialist, prior approval wrangler, and fiancé) to tell these people that I do not prescribe the monoproduct to new patients. I have no problems saying “no” upfront to these patients, and try to explain why I’ve made this decision for my private practice (even though, as above, I have prescribed it for patients I know very well).

I use the monoproduct in the opioid treatment program where I work, because those patients dose with us every day until they have a period of stability. The dosing nurses roughly chop the tablets, to minimize diversion, and patients stay on-premises until the medication has dissolved, also to make diversion more difficult. These patients don’t get any take home doses until we feel they have stabilized.

We also discussed how long to keep patients on buprenorphine. The bottom line is that no one knows. Best outcomes are seen in patients who stay on buprenorphine, since there’s still a high relapse rate back to opioids in patients who stop buprenorphine. I ask my patients periodically if they wish to start a slow taper, if they’ve been stable for over a year. I don’t push them to taper if they’re not ready, but if they are, I recommend they taper slowly. From the discussion at this meeting, it sounds like most of my colleagues do the same.

We discussed the maximum daily dose of buprenorphine. According to studies, a daily dose of 16mg saturates most of a patient’s opioid receptors, and increasing the dose to 24mg only gives about a 4% increase in the number of covered opioid receptors. Some doctors say this shows buprenorphine should never be dosed more than 16mg per day.

However, about a third of the doctors in the room raised their hands when the moderator asked if they had any patients who seemed to require 24mg per day to stabilize.

I didn’t interject anything into the discussion, but I just went to a session at the national ASAM meeting where this same topic was discussed. While it’s true that basic pharmacology would indicate 16mg is probably the just as effective as 24mg in most patients, several studies have shown better patient retention in treatment when higher doses (24-32mg per day) are used.

It’s possible this isn’t a physiologic effect, but more of a mental process. We can’t be sure. But for whatever reason, if my patient does best at 24mg, I’ll allow her to stay on that dose.

For patients on higher doses, we need to make sure they aren’t diverting some of their medication. Patients sometimes ask for a higher dose than they need, in order to get enough medication to treat a friend, family member, or significant other. Some doctors call this “piggy-backing.” Even though it means a suffering addict is getting treatment, the piggy-backer won’t get any counseling. Also, law enforcement types use examples of diversion to demonstrate that buprenorphine is a bad street drug, contributing to the stigma against patients doing well in their treatment. Diversion threatens the whole concept of office-based treatment program.

All in all, we had two hours of lively interaction on the finer points of office-based prescribing of buprenorphine. I don’t think all doctors will agree about everything, but it’s nice to hear what other physicians are doing, to make sure I am not too far out of line with the standard of care.

Good News for Opioid Addicts: Reckitt’s Requests Rejected by the FDA

aahuzzah

This week’s issue of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Weekly ran a front page article about the FDA’s recent ruling on Reckitt Benckiser’s requests. Reckitt, the manufacturer of buprenorphine (Suboxone and Subutex), had submitted a Citizen’s Petition to the FDA, asking them to refuse to approve any form of buprenorphine that didn’t have additional child-resistant safety measures.

Last year, Reckitt said they were taking the tablet form off the market because of increased risk for pediatric exposure with tablets as compared to the newer film form of Suboxone. Cynics (like me) said this was an attempt to hide profit motives behind claims of concern for children. The film is still under patent, while the patent for the tablet form had already expired. This Citizen’s Petition was felt by some (like me) to be an additional smokescreen, invented to prevent the release of a generic competitor.

In their ruling at the end of February of this year, the FDA said the scientific and regulatory concerns raised by Reckitt’s petition weren’t valid. They said there was no proof of Reckitt’s claim that the unit-dose packaging of the film reduced pediatric exposures. The FDA noted that the new REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy), put in place for buprenorphine and other opioids, could have caused the decline in pediatric exposures. The FDA has also made efforts to educate physicians about overdose potential in children. The FDA also pointed out that many drugs dangerous to children are packaged in bottles, rather than unit –dose packaging. Also, the FDA pointed out that Reckitt received the pediatric overdose information two years before they announced they would voluntarily stop making the tablets due to pediatric overdose concern. This delay undermined their claim of making the change for patient safety.

The FDA criticized Reckitt for making these safety claims, yet still selling the tablets. In fact, the FDA has asked the Federal Trade Commission, the FTC, to investigate the United Kingdom-based Reckitt-Benckiser for possible anticompetitive business practices.

I admired Reckitt Benckiser when they first released Suboxone. At last, a drug company was willing to take a chance on manufacturing a medication to treat addiction. Since drug addicts often don’t have insurance or money, this is not usually a lucrative market. They took a financial risk. They funded, or helped to fund, many of the training programs doctors needed to get licensed to prescribe Suboxone. Reckitt provided free treatment for a few indigent patients per doctor with their Here to Help program. They provided telephone support to addicts entering Suboxone treatment, at no cost, though few addicts used this benefit.

But over the last few years, Reckitt Benckiser has lost credibility with me. I feel they’ve become heavy-handed, and have pressured doctors to prescribe only the films, saying it’s less likely to be sold on the black market and less likely to be misused than the tablets. That may be true, but some patients don’t like the film, and would leave treatment if it’s the only available medication. And many addicts have written in to this blog, claiming to be able to dilute and inject the films more easily than the tablets. At the same time, the prices of the Suboxone tablets skyrocketed, in an attempt to force patients to switch to films. Reckitt of course also discouraged doctors from prescribing the less expensive generic monoproduct buprenorphine, which costs less than half of the name brand manufactured by Reckitt.

Then there was that whole pediatric overdose issue. After that, my opinion of Reckitt fell. They lost credibility with me.

The two drug companies that make the generic form of Suboxone say their tablets should be available in pharmacies within a month. Actavis, based in New Jersey, is the third largest manufacturer of generic medications. The other manufacturer, Amnel Pharmaceutical, is also based in New Jersey and is the 7th largest generic manufacturer. Amnel’s press release describes their tablet as being cheaper than Suboxone, with a “pleasant orange flavor.”

I can’t wait to see how much these generics will cost. I’d expect them to be a little more expensive than the generic monoproduct buprenorphine. In my area, that generic sells for around three to four dollars per pill, less than half what the name brand Suboxone costs now.

The release of these two generics will likely mean more patients will be able to afford addiction treatment. The more affordable treatment becomes, the more patients will take advantage of help for their addiction.

Huzzah for the FDA! This was a good decision.

Smuggling Suboxone

I was intrigued by an article I saw on my internet homepage. It was titled: “When Children’s Scribbles Hide a Prison Drug”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/27/us/27smuggle.html?_r=1&hpw

 This article describes unique ways Suboxone is being smuggled into jails. Law enforcement officials associated with both state and county jails from Maine and Massachusetts were interviewed. They say prisoners and their accomplices make Suboxone into a paste and smear it over the surfaces of papers sent to prisoners from their families. The article mentions the paste being spread over children’s coloring book pages, and under stamps. Suboxone films have been placed behind stamps or in envelope seams. Correctional officers now have to inspect material coming in the mail to prisoners much more closely.

 I had several thoughts. First, yet again, I’m struck by the creativity and cleverness of addicts. If only they could channel this energy in the right direction, amazingly good things could come to them, instead of the continued hardships brought by addiction.

 Then I felt sad that such actions described in the article would taint the reputation of a medication that has the potential to save lives, when used appropriately. Such illicit use of Suboxone gives ammunition to those who would prefer that office-based treatment with Suboxone didn’t exist.

 Then I wondered, how many of these prisoners have a legitimate prescription for Suboxone, but are denied their medication by prison officials? How many are legitimate patients of methadone clinics, also denied their medication while imprisoned, who know that Suboxone will alleviate some of the opioid withdrawal they are feeling? How many of these people are addicted to opioids, not in any kind of treatment, but who know Suboxone will treat their withdrawals?

At least one study supports the idea that many people use Suboxone illicitly not to get high, but to prevent withdrawal. Dr. Schuman-Olivier studied 78 opioid addicts entering treatment. Nearly half said they had used Suboxone illicitly prior to entering treatment. Of these people, 90% said they used to prevent withdrawal symptoms. These addicts also said they used Suboxone illicitly to treat pain and to ease depression.

Many law enforcement personnel and members of the legal community have strong biases against medication-assisted treatments. They don’t understand that addiction is a disease, and that methadone and buprenorphine are legitimate, evidence-based treatments. They have difficulty letting go of their idea that addiction is a choice that deserves blame, and have a punitive stance towards addicts. They have low opinions of addicts who are using drugs, but often have no better opinion of a recovering addict who has sought treatment and is doing well on replacement medications, like methadone or buprenorphine.

 But no matter what law enforcement personnel think they know, when they deny prescribed, life-saving medications, I believe they’re practicing medicine without a license.

The article mentions one woman who, with the aid of the Maine Civil Liberties Union, sued because her Suboxone treatment had not been continued while she was in jailed for a traffic violation. She settled out of court, but her lawyer made the excellent point that if inmates are denied their medications, they will try unlawful means to get it.

Other patients and their families have brought successful lawsuits against the jail facilities. In at least two cases, in the same Orange County, Florida jail, patient/prisoners were allowed to go through withdrawal for so long that they died. The estate of one person won a three million dollar judgment against the county. (1, 2)

I’m glad to see these lawsuits. I’ve heard appalling stories from many methadone patients, who were denied their medication while incarcerated. I’ve heard tales of jailers taunting these prisoners, when they became sick. There is no defense for such cruelty.

Orange County now works with local methadone clinics. If a prisoner is a current patient of a clinic, his clinic will send a week’s worth of medication in a locked box via courier. Nurses at the jail have the key to the box, and administer each day’s dose. The jail doctor consults with the medical director at the methadone clinic. Prisoners still have to pay out of pocket to get the medication, so the only cost to the jail is the time required for personnel to administer the medication. It’s certainly much cheaper than paying three million to the estate of a dead prisoner, not to mention much more humane.

I wish the county jails around the methadone clinic where I work would approach the problem of opioid addiction and treatment in a collaborative way. Sadly, only seven state prison systems offer medication-assisted treatment with methadone or buprenorphine.

Rikers Island, in New York City, gives us another example of how such a system could work. There, opioid-addicted prisoners charged with misdemeanors or low grade felonies can be enrolled in a program known as KEEP (Key Extended Entry Program). This program treats opioid addicts with methadone and counseling. Upon release from Rikers Island, these patients are referred to methadone treatment centers in the community. Seventy-six percent have followed through with their treatment, post-release. The results of this program show significant reduction in reincarceration and significant reduction in criminal activity. (3)

Drug courts trying to save money would be well-advised to look at the Rikers Island program. Studies have shown a cost savings of at least four dollars for every one dollar spent on methadone treatment. This money is saved because methadone patients require fewer days of hospitalization and other healthcare costs, and also because of reduction in criminal activity and incarceration costs. (3, 4)

I know from comments written to this blog that there are many more people abusing Suboxone than I previously imagined. For sure, some of the prisoners getting smuggled Suboxone are misusing it. But I don’t think the majority are using for anything other than prevention of withdrawal, since they are usually not offered any other effective treatment for this medical condition.

  1. “Outrageous: the death of Susan Bennett raises serious questions about the competence and quality of the jail’s nursing staff” Orlando Sentinel, editorial, March 27, 1998.
  2. Doris Bloodsworth, “Inmate begged for methadone” Orlando Sentinel July 12, 2001.
  3. Par`rino, Mark, “Methadone Treatment in Jail,” American Jails, Vol: 14, 2000, issue 2, pp 9-12.
  4. California Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs, 2004, California drug and alcohol treatment assessment (CALDATA) California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. California Drug and Alcohol Treatment Assessment (CALDATA), 1991-1993 [Computer File]. ICPSR02295-v2. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-10-07. doi:10.3886/ICPSR02295