Archive for the ‘prescription monotoring programs’ Category

Governor Scott’s Flamingo Express to Misery

Flamingo Express of Florida

All I could think was, “What can he be thinking???”

 I was reading an article about the governor of Florida and his bizarre decision to block the formation of a prescription monitoring program in his state. (1)

 Prescription monitoring programs are databases that contain lists of controlled substances a patient receives, the prescribing doctors, and the dispensing pharmacies. Usually, only approved physicians can get access to these databases. Prescription monitoring programs help prevent “doctor shopping,” which is the term describing the actions of a patient who goes from one doctor to another to get prescription pills, usually opioids, without telling the doctors about each other. Addicts do this to supply their ever-increasing tolerance for the drugs. Drug dealers do this to get pills to sell and make money.

 Forty-two states have approved the formation of prescription monitoring databases, and thirty-four states have operational databases. Florida was one of the last to approve the formation of such a program, in 2009, long after this recent wave of prescription pain pill addiction burned through the country. Now, the new Florida governor wants to cut this program out completely, before it even starts.

 How big of a deal is this?

In the latest survey, 5.3 million people in the U.S. used prescription pain pills nonmedically over the past month. This means they used them in ways not intended, or for reasons not intended by the prescriber… for example, to get high. In the last year, 2.2 million people misused these prescription pain pills for the first time. Our young people are particularly at risk; between 2002 and 2009, the percentage of 12 to 17 years olds misusing prescription opioids rose from 4.1% to 4.8%. Not all of these people will become addicted, thankfully. Some will only experiment, and be able to stop before addiction develops. Many won’t be able to stop taking pills, and will progress into the misery of addiction. Others will die of drug overdoses. (2)

 Why pick on Florida?

Florida is infamous for its pain clinics. As a reporter for Time Magazine pointed out, there are more pain clinics in South Florida than there are McDonald’s franchises. In 2009, 98 of the top 100 prescribers of oxycodone in the nation were all located in Florida. Altogether, these doctors prescribed 19 million dosage units of oxycodone in 2009. Estimates of the numbers of pain clinics located in South Florida vary, but most sources say between 150 and 175. (3, 4) Many of these clinics are “pill mills,” where doctors freely prescribe controlled substances with little regard to usual prescribing standards and guidelines.

 Are all these clinics pill mills?

No. Some of the pain clinics are legitimate, and their doctors follow best practice guidelines, providing quality care to patients with pain. But careful monitoring and screening for adverse events, including the development of addiction, takes time. A conscientious doctor, trying  to do a good job, isn’t going to be able to see fifty pain patients in one day.

 I’ve talked to addicts who were previously patients at these pill mills. They describe how they were shuffled through rapidly, sometimes not even seeing the doctor. Some addicts say they were asked what pills they wanted, and quickly written that prescription, with little or no conversation beyond that. That was the extent of the visit. 

But Florida’s problem doesn’t stay in Florida. Appalachian states like Kentucky, West Virginia, and North Carolina all have addicts who buy these prescription pain pills after they’re transported out of Florida. The DEA sees so many pain pills being transported from Florida to Appalachian states that they call it the “Flamingo Express.” In one of the methadone clinics where I work, I’ve noticed a peculiar upswing in the reported use of Opana, a brand name for the drug oxymorphone. It’s not a drug I’ve seen prescribed much in NC. When I ask patients where the pills come from, many say, “Florida.”

 Governors of several states, including West Virginia and Kentucky, along with congressmen from New York and Rhode Island, have sent a letter to Florida’s Governor Scott, urging him to reconsider his decision to torpedo plans for a prescription monitoring program. Since the leading cause of death in West Virginians for those under the age of 45 is drug overdose, I can see why this governor is protesting Governor Scott’s poor decision. (4)

 It’s estimated that setting up a prescription monitoring program costs about one million dollars. The Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Fund, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to raising money for the program, says on their website that they’ve already raised at least half of that from donations. Other states have received the Harold Rogers grant money, available from the federal government to set up these monitoring databases. This leads me to question the excuse of “budget cuts” as the reason for Governor Scott’s poor decision.

 I’ve also seen internet stories that mention the governor’s fear of invasion of privacy. This is a legitimate concern, but there are ways to safeguard the information in such a database, and laws that can regulate who has access. I’m no fan of the government peering into my business, but this database is essential, given the overwhelming numbers of people struggling with pain pill addiction. For a description of the ways in which the North Carolina prescription monitoring database has helped me help my patients, please see the preceding blog entry. It’s been a lifesaver.  

  1. http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2011-03-05/news/fl-prescription-drug-forum-20110305_1_pill-mills-prescription-drug-monitoring-program-attorney-general-pam-bondi (accessed 3/6/11)
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2010). Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Volume I. Summary of National Findings (Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H-38A, HHS Publication No. SMA 10-4586Findings). Rockville, MD.
  3. Thomas R. Collins, Invasion of the Pill Mills in South Florida, Time, Tuesday, Apr. 13, 2010,  Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  4.  http://manchin.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/press-releases?   ContentRecord_id=f62482b4-f6dd-4adc-8b49-1563d8fa605b&ContentType_id=ec9a1142-0ea4-4086-95b2-b1fc9cc47db5&Group_id=e3f09d56-daa7-43fd-aa8b-bd2aeb8d7777&MonthDisplay=2&YearDisplay=2011 (accessed 3/8/11)

Use of Prescription Monitoring in Suboxone Patients

I enthusiastically use my state’s prescription monitoring program. This database is available only to physicians who have applied and been approved for access. It records all controlled substance prescriptions filled by a patient, the prescribing doctor, and the pharmacy where they were filled. This means it records prescriptions for opioids, benzodiazepines, anabolic steroids, most sleeping pills, and prescription stimulants. Any prescription medication with the potential to cause addiction will be listed. Medications such an antibiotics, blood pressure medication, etc, aren’t controlled substances, and aren’t list on the website. 

I use this database in several ways.

It can help me decide if a new patient is really addicted to opioids, and appropriate for treatment

If a new patient has a urine drug screen that’s negative for all the opioids, and has no record of getting prescriptions for opioids, I’ll have to see objective evidence of addiction before starting to treat him with Suboxone. But if the urine is negative, and I see monthly oxymorphone prescriptions (sometimes missed on urine drug screens) have been filled, it’s more likely this patient is appropriate for Suboxone treatment. Rarely, a misguided, misinformed person might claim to be addicted to opioids in order to be prescribed Suboxone. This happened once to me, with a patient who was addicted to Xanax, and was convinced Suboxone would cure her. I referred her to more appropriate care.

Using the database can help detect a relapse sooner

Most of the patients in my Suboxone practice (around 80%) are pill takers, not heroin users. When they relapse, it tends to be to prescription opioids, obtained from a doctor unfamiliar with their history of addiction. I check each patient on the state’s database just prior to each visit, and if there are medications on the site I didn’t know about, that will be the main topic of our visit. New medication on the database doesn’t always mean a relapse, so I need to listen to their explanation.

 When it does mean a relapse, the patient and I decide what to do next. Often, the patient decides to allow me to call the other doctor, agrees to increase her “dose” of counseling, and possibly her dose of Suboxone, if it was an opioid relapse. If there are repeated relapses, I may decide Suboxone, as an outpatient, doesn’t provide the support a patient needs. Then, I refer to another form of treatment. Usually this means to a long-term inpatient drug rehab, or to an opioid treatment center, where the patient comes to the clinic every day. Either way, I believe I’m able to address a relapse more quickly using the database.

 Frequently, Suboxone patients get prescriptions for benzodiazepines. That’s a problem for me. For a person without addiction, benzodiazepines can be helpful, mostly used short-term. But for people with addiction, they usually cause problems, sooner or later. People with a previous addiction to any drug, especially including alcohol, need to regard prescription benzodiazepines as high-risk medications.

 I try to be flexible, too. If a traumatic event has occurred in the life of a patient, I may OK benzodiazepines short-term, provided I can see the patient more often and have good communication with the doctor prescribing the benzodiazepines.

  I also have to remember the body reacts the same to a mixture of opioids and benzos, no matter why they’re taken.  Even though Suboxone is safer than methadone, it’s still not safe when mixed with benzos, when taken for any reason.

If this sounds wishy-washy, that’s because it is. So many situations arise in the lives of patients that one hard and fast rule just doesn’t exist. That’s the art of medicine.

 Is the patient filling Suboxone on time?

The database also shows me when patients are filling the Suboxone prescription. If I write a prescription today, but the patient doesn’t fill it for two weeks, what’s going on there? Has he relapsed for several weeks? Did he have a stockpile of Suboxone from a previous prescription? Was he unable to afford it until now? All these questions and their answers are important to guide treatment.

 It makes me happy.

It warms my heart to see a patient who had a long list of opioid prescriptions from multiple doctors before starting Suboxone, then after entering treatment, see only Suboxone. This occurs in the majority of my patients.

My state’s prescription monitoring program is one of the best tools to help patients that I’ve ever seen. I believe it’s saved many lives. I think it’s just as important as drug screening for my Suboxone patients. Of course, the best tool for recovery is the counseling. I prefer 12-step recovery, as that provides ongoing support even after Suboxone treatment, but any kind of counseling helps. The patients I see doing the best are the ones involved in both formal counseling, in group or individual settings, along with 12-step meetings.

Why are so many people addicted to prescription pain pills?

I was reading a great blog I’ve started visiting, http:addictionblog.org and came across an entry about why the U.S. has more pain pill addicts now than 10 years ago.

I couldn’t resist blathering on,  commenting on the blog. I wrote so much the software thought I was spamming. So I thought I’d repeat my comments here, on my blog.

This is an important issue. We now have an estimated 1.7 to 2 million people addicted to prescription pain pills. Many of the conditions that contributed to this wave of addiction have been changed – but not all.

Prescription opioid addiction has increased dramatically over the last decade, due to a combination of factors. First, there was the pain management movement, which emphasized the importance of adequate pain control. Of course that’s an admirable goal, but the risks of addiction were understated due to bad science and misinterpretation of limited data. Instead of a risk of addiction of about 1%, quoted by many pain management gurus, the true incidence is more like 10 – 45%, depending on which study you read.

Then against that backdrop, OxyContin was released and marketed to general practitioners and family docs with limited knowledge about how to identify and treat addiction. In general, medical schools and residencies have done a lousy job of educating doctors about proper prescribing of opioid medications, how to identify addiction, and where to refer people for treatment of their addiction.

 Then there was access to opioids via the internet, which actually seemed to be a bigger problem than it was. A small percentage of abused opioids came from the internet, but some people became addicted in that way. With the changing laws, these rogue internet pharmacies are less numerous.

States most heavily afflicted by pain pill addiction didn’t have prescription monitoring programs in place. These programs are essential tools to identify people who are getting pills from more than one doctor at a time, called “doctor shopping,” which is often an indication the person has an addiction that needs treatment. Fortunately, most states either have these programs now or are in the process of putting them into place.

But a big part of the problem is cultural. We share prescription medications, even controlled substances, with alarming frequency. Most people aged 18 – 24 who use pain pills nonmedically get them from friends or family, not from some nefarious dealer on the corner. Adolescents don’t realize how dangerous prescription pain pills are.

Anyone with pain pills in their medicine cabinet needs to lock them up to keep them safe, or dispose of medication when they are no longer needed. And we need to stop sharing our medications. It’s illegal, dangerous, and contributes to addiction.