Posts Tagged ‘access to primary care’

Patients with Substance Use Histories Denied Primary Care

Shocked and Appalled

 

 

 

 

 

One of my long-time and very stable patients saw me a few weeks ago for her yearly history and physical. That’s a minimum requirement for the patients I treat with methadone or buprenorphine at the opioid treatment program. For patients in treatment for many months, I no longer need to see them frequently for positive drug screens, dose adjustments, and other things, so we make sure to set aside time each year for me to catch up on how they are doing.

This isn’t only good medical care, but it’s fun for me. I love talking to patients and hearing the ways in which their lives have improved. It’s fun for them to discuss how they are accomplishing their life goals.

This day, after asking about the adequacy of her dose, her mood, her sleeping habits and biggest sources of stress, I asked about her overall health. To start with, I asked the name of her primary care physician. She told me she couldn’t get one, because of her history of opioid use.

I asked for further details: she called a local practice about becoming established as a patient, and part of their screening was to ask if she’d ever been prescribed opioids. She said yes, but that problem was in the past, and she didn’t need opioids now. She was then told that the practice wasn’t accepting any patients with a history of opioid use.

Merely opioid use, mind you – not opioid use disorder.

This wasn’t because of her insurance status, as she is covered by the largest private insurance carrier in the state, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of NC.

She said her feelings were hurt, and she started crying as soon as she got off the phone. She said, “They made me feel like a piece of shit.” She even teared up in my office as we were talking two weeks later.

This does not sit right with me.

I gave her the website of the North Carolina Medical Board and gave her the web address and phone number of where and how to file a complaint against that practice. I told her that denying entry to primary care for a patient because of past opioid use was immoral, if not illegal. I’m not a lawyer, but I figured if she let the medical board know, they could figure this out.

She hadn’t even told them she was on methadone. I know it’s a violation of the American with Disabilities Act, the ADA, to discriminate against someone with opioid use disorder who is in recovery on medication-assisted therapy. But I didn’t think that was the case for her, since she didn’t have time to tell them she was on methadone. By her description, their decision was based only on her history of receiving opioid prescriptions in the past.

I doubt there was any misunderstanding on her part, since she’s not the first patient we’ve had who reported similar situations. Also, local practices tell our patients on methadone or buprenorphine that they don’t have the “expertise” to care for them if they are taking methadone or buprenorphine from me.

This is ridiculous, since primary care physicians care for patients with specialty medications all the time. Cardiac patients on complicated heart medications still get primary care. HIV patients on powerful anti-viral medications still get primary care. Patients with opioid use disorder are no different.

But to be denied primary care merely because opioids have been prescribed in the past…it’s a step beyond the usual discrimination I see.

Of course, if the medical board does investigate, I expect that practice will blame the patient for misunderstanding, and say they accept all patients. Maybe…but at least they will be on notice that discriminatory practices can and will get them into problems. Hopefully they will be less likely to do this again.

No wonder local death rates increased. Not only are we dealing with the continued opioid use disorder epidemic with its opioid overdose death risk, but also with a lack of medical care for those people who survive opioid use disorder. It’s a double assault on patient health.

I live in a beautiful part on this country, but the medical care in this community often baffles me.

After a free-for-all on prescribing opioids, benzos and stimulants for a decade or two, the patients in this area for whom those were prescribed now can’t even get a primary care practitioner. It’s as if local doctors think that after the pendulum swung so far in one direction, it must swing too far in the other.

Common sense should dictate care – let’s not prescribe controlled substances willy-nilly but let’s not be stingy with opioids in cases of acute pain. And let’s not deny patients care if they’ve been prescribed opioids in the past.

What about repercussions from insurance companies? Will insurance companies allow certain prescribers to opt out of treating their covered enrollees because of past prescriptions?

Here’s another discriminatory wrinkle: life insurance companies are turning down coverage for people who have filled prescriptions for Narcan. A friend of mine sent me a link to this story:

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/12/13/674586548/nurse-denied-life-insurance-because-she-carries-naloxone

This is a link to the story of a nurse who was turned down for life insurance because she has filled a prescription for Narcan. This nurse works at an addiction treatment program and wanted to be able to revive people and save lives. The insurance company, Primerica, is now being criticized because it turned down her request for life insurance since she filled a Narcan prescription.

Now that they are being criticized for their stance, they issued a statement saying something to the effect that they support efforts to turn the tide on the opioid epidemic. But it appears that support doesn’t extend to offering life insurance to people who have obtained a Narcan kit.

This nurse applied at a second company and was turned down again, though she was told if she got a letter from her primary care doctor explaining why the Narcan was prescribed, they might re-consider. The trouble is, in Massachusetts, personal physicians don’t write prescriptions. To reduce barriers to receiving Narcan kits, the state allows any person who wants a kit to be able to get it under a standing order.

The physician behind this standing order is a well-known and well-respected physician, prominent in the Addiction Medicine field, Dr. Alex Walley.

Doctor Walley says he’s written other letters for similar situations where people are denied life insurance due to filling Narcan prescriptions to have on hand to save lives. He’s worried – obviously – that people will be discouraged from getting Narcan kits. These kits and their availability have been responsible for saving many lives in this nation.

These examples of poor decision making do nothing but extend the misery of people with opioid use disorder, in or out of treatment, and their families.

I’ve been working in my community for seven years, trying to inform and educate other medical providers about medication-assisted treatment. Most of the time, I feel positive, thankful to form good relationships with some providers and to coordinate care for my patients on medication-assisted treatments.

Then there are days when I feel so discouraged. it feels like there’s been no progress at all with deeply embedded bias and stigma against people with opioid use providers, their families, and the professionals who try to provide care to them.

 

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