Posts Tagged ‘drug abuse task force’

Update

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Last week, I told my readers about a letter I sent to my local newspaper, trying to explain the usefulness of methadone (and buprenorphine) treatment for opioid addiction. Happily, my entire letter was published in our local paper under the heading of “Guest Columnist.”

I was elated, especially since this piece of writing was on a topic about which I’m passionate.

I checked Friday’s paper to see if anyone had responded to my column. There were no replies, but there was another article in that issue, titled, “Task Force Targets Schools.”

This article was about the meeting of a drug abuse task force formed earlier this year by local people. Before you ask, yes, this is in the same county where Project Lazarus, founded in 2008 in response to high drug overdose death rates, has its headquarters. And no, I do not know why people in this new task force feel the need to re-invent the wheel, particularly in an area where the prior inventors of the wheel have had such success and nationwide praise. Indeed, many other areas of the country have copied the Project Lazarus model of addressing the multifactorial causes and contributors of addiction

Anyway, I don’t know the motivations of this new task force. Interestingly, this quote was found early in the article: “Education and dissemination of information appears to be the greatest way the task force can make a difference.” This was said one of the co-chairmen of the organization. This quote was in the context of providing information to youths to prevent drug use and drug addiction.

I sure as hell wish that statement also applied to facts around treatment of addiction.

At some point, methadone apparently became the topic of discussion, which was a shame, because task force members sound like they don’t know anything about methadone. I wish they would have read my guest column two days prior!

Here’s a quote from the paper from one of the task force members: “From the way I understand it, the methadone clinics are not weaning these people off methadone. They’re going for treatments and they’re just going and going and going,” According to the article, he also said that state government should be involved in requiring plans that give people certain amounts of time to be off methadone and then with helping them.

Then the co-chair of the task force, a law enforcement trainer at the local community college, said methadone clinics are supposed to have personalized plans for people who come in for treatment. “It doesn’t appear that those plans are followed exactly the way they should be,” he added. “It’s a business model.”

I’m not sure what qualifies this man to know how long methadone should be prescribed for the purposes of treating opioid addiction. He’s not a doctor.

Then another person in the task force said the goal is for a person going to one of the clinics to be off methadone in a year, “but that doesn’t happen…. It’s a business.” She said only a small percentage kick their addictions.

Who is this second person? She is – wait for it – a Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist. She works for a program where we have referred patients in the past.

As all my readers know, I am a calm and patient person who never takes things personally (yeah that’s sarcasm). Even more fortunately, I’m not the litigious type, because when someone says at a public forum that the local methadone clinic keeps patients on methadone because it’s a business model, that’s a defamatory statement. That implies I prescribe methadone to make money and not to help patients. This statement attacks my character as the medical director of that program, and cast dispersions on my professional integrity.

Drug addiction treatment should be about science, not opinion.

I know the right thing to do, the grown-up thing to do… call task force members and politely offer to educate them about MAT.

I’ll get there. But right now, I’m not ready to be a grown up.