Posts Tagged ‘heroin overdose’

Fentanyl is the New Heroin

aaaaoverdose-deaths

 

 

 

Big drug labs in China and Mexico have found it’s cheaper to manufacture the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl than it is to harvest and process opium into heroin. Therefore, much of what is sold as heroin is now mixed with fentanyl and its more potent analogues, sufentanil and carfentanil.

This is causing heroin overdose deaths in the U.S.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse issued a recent report saying that heroin overdose deaths increased over six-fold from 2002 to 2015. This is shown in the graphic at the beginning of this blog.

This problem is worse in some regions of our country than others; the Northeast has traditionally been plagued with heroin deaths at a high rates, but other areas of the country have higher rates of increase in heroin deaths.

There’s no way to know the potency of drugs sold as heroin, making it much easier to overdose and die.

There are some basic precautions that drug users can take to prevent overdose deaths. This is data all comes from the Harm Reduction Coalition:

  • Don’t use alone. Use with a friend, and stagger your injection times so that one person is alert enough to summon help if needed.
  • Have a naloxone kit available and know how to use it. You can get a free kit from many places, including harm reduction organizations. http://harmreduction.org/issues/overdose-prevention/tools-best-practices/od-kit-materials/
  • Do a test dose. This means instead of injecting your usual amount, try a tiny bit of the drug first, to help assess how strong it is.
  • Use new equipment, if possible. Some pharmacies are willing to sell new needles and syringes with no questions asked. Other drug users in your community may be able to tell you which pharmacies are willing to do this.
  • Remember that if you’ve had a period of time where you’ve been unable to use any drugs, your tolerance may be much lower. Highest overdose risk is seen in patients who have just been released from jail, from detox units, or from the hospital. Do NOT go back to the same amount you were using in the past.
  • Don’t mix drugs. Opioid overdose risk increases when other drugs are used too.
  • Consider getting into addiction treatment. https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

 

aaaaodpills

 

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Harm Reduction: Use Precautions

aaaaaainjecting

 

 

I’m worried about the people in my community who have opioid use disorders. The rate of opioid overdoses appears to have risen, according to my local newspaper, along with the number of overdose deaths. I think it’s at least partly due to the arrival of heroin in our county. I think it’s time I re-posted some harm reduction suggestions for people who are using opioids.

The ultimate harm reduction measure is to get treatment and get into recovery, but if you aren’t ready for that, please be careful when you use drugs.

You can access all the following information, and more, at: http://harmreduction.org/drugs-and-drug-users/drug-tools/getting-off-right/

This is a link to a booklet about how to inject drugs more safely, downloadable for free, or available in hard copy for a small fee. It contains excellent information which could be life-saving.

  1. Don’t use alone. Use a buddy system, to have someone who can call 911 in case you stop breathing. Do the same for another addict. Obviously you shouldn’t inject at the same time. Stagger your injection times.

Many states now have Good Samaritan laws that protect the overdose victim and the person calling 911 for help, so that police don’t give criminal charges to people who do the right thing by calling for help for an overdose.
Take a class on how to give CPR so that you can revive a friend or acquaintance with an overdose while you wait on EMS to arrive.

  1. Get a naloxone kit. I’ve blogged these kits before, and they are becoming more available. So far, about seven or eight of my opioid treatment program patients have used their kits to save other people. The kits are easy to use and very effective. You can read more about these kits at the Project Lazarus website: http://projectlazarus.org/

Evzio is a commercially available kit, very easy to use, that gives verbal instructions about how to use the kit.

Some states, like North Carolina, now have third party prescribing, meaning if you have a loved one with opioid use disorder, you can request a naloxone kit prescription from your own doctor, to have on hand for your loved one with addiction.

  1. Use new equipment. Many pharmacies sell needles and syringes without asking questions. Other people with opioid use disorder probably can tell you which pharmacies are the most understanding.

    Don’t use a needle and syringe more than once. Repeated use dulls the needle’s point and causes more damage to the vein and surrounding tissue. Don’t try to re-sharpen on a matchbook – frequently this can cause burrs on the needle point which can cause even more tissue damage.

  2. Don’t share any equipment. Many people who wouldn’t think of sharing a needle still share cottons, cookers, or spoons, but hepatitis C and HIV can be transmitted by sharing any of this other equipment. If you have to share or re-use equipment, wash needle and syringe with cold water several times, then do the same again with bleach. Finally, wash out the bleach with cold water. This reduces the risk of transmitting HIV and Hepatitis C, but isn’t foolproof.
  3. Use a tester shot. Since heroin varies widely in its potency, use small amount of the drug to assess its potency. You can always use more, but once it’s been injected you can’t use less. The overdoses on heroin are thought to be due to fentanyl added to the heroin, making it more powerful and more dangerous.
  4. Use clean cotton to filter the drug. Use cotton from a Q-tip or cotton ball; cigarette filters are not as safe because they contain glass particles.
  5. Wash your hands thoroughly before preparing your shot, and clean the injection site with an alcohol wipe if possible. Don’t use lemon juice to help dissolve heroin, as it carries a contaminant that can cause a serous fungal infection.
  6. Opioid overdoses are much more likely to occur in a person who hasn’t used recently or has used less than usual for a few days, weeks, or longer. Overdose risks are much higher in people just getting out of jail and just getting out of a detox. Patients who have recently stopped using Suboxone or Subutex may be more likely to overdose if they resume their usual amount of IV opioids.
  7. Don’t mix drugs. Many opioid overdoses occur with combinations of opioids and alcohol or benzodiazepines, though overdose can certainly occur with opioids alone.
  8. Don’t inject an overdosed person with salt water, ice water, or a stimulant such as cocaine or crystal methamphetamine – these don’t work and may cause harm. Don’t put the person in an ice bath and don’t leave them alone. Call for help, and give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if you can. And use naloxone if you have it.

To people who believe I’m giving addicts permission to use, I’d like to remind them that people using opioids don’t care if someone gives them permission or not. If they want to use, what other people think matters little. But giving people information about how to inject more safely may help keep them alive.

The Harm Reduction Coalition has excellent information on its website: http://harmreduction.org

In North Carolina, we are fortunate to have a robust Harm Reduction Coalition chapter. You can read more about their remarkable work at:   http://www.nchrc.org/

If you are a person who uses drugs and never plan to quit, your life has purpose and meaning. Use these safety tips to stay around for it.

Heroin Epidemic versus Pain Pill Addiction Epidemic

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagraph of heroin deaths

I’m surprised at all the coverage heroin addiction has received in the past few months. Breathless headlines are appearing in all forms of media about our “new” addiction problem. Friends send me links to articles about addiction since they know that’s the field I work in. I’m as surprised to see all the media coverage now as I used to be puzzled about the lack of coverage five years ago. I’ve been treating opioid addiction for the last fourteen years, and the opioid addiction epidemic isn’t new. It’s been very well established for years.

Perhaps the idea of using heroin jolts people more than the idea of using prescription opioids. Maybe people don’t understand that prescription opioid addiction has the same physiologic process as heroin addiction. Manufactured pain pills have less variation in content than balloons of black tar heroin, so there may be less risk of overdose. However, the body responds the same to both types of opioids. The body develops addiction and physical dependency in the same way to both heroin and prescription opioids, and withdrawal symptoms and cravings are the same. Both overdose and death happens with both types of opioids.

Perhaps heroin is perceived as the hardest of hard drugs, and therefore data about heroin addiction captures more attention than pain pill use. Maybe the use of heroin crosses a line that’s not perceived by prescription opioid addiction.

Can it be that there are still people who believe if it is a prescription medication, that it’s safe? Or is it just easier to justify the misuse of a pain pill? Communities with years of rampant pain pill addiction are only now wringing their hands because of heroin addiction. These communities are now demanding action from our government.

I’m glad for the attention to the problem of opioid addiction because I’ve seen way too much complacency about this issue for way too long.

I’m also irritated.

In 2009, I wrote a book about pain pill addiction. I was extremely lucky to get an agent, and she shopped my book to four or five mid-level publishing houses. They weren’t interested because they felt the book didn’t have a broad enough appeal. I ended up self-publishing, and sold around 500-600 copies. That’s not too bad for a self-published book, but distribution could have been much broader through a publishing house. Having my book turned down by publishers with an utter lack of interest in the subject matter undoubtedly causes some of my irritation.

I went to the ASAM conference where the head of the CDC pledged to get involved in the treatment and prevention of opioid addiction. Don’t get me wrong; that’s a wonderful thing to hear. The problem is, that was in 2012.

For all who’ve just joined the movement to help opioid addicted people get help, welcome. I’m glad you’re here, and we can use your help. And forgive me for wishing you had been interested in this problem ten years ago.

Warning Warning Warning

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaacution

If you are still using heroin, or know someone using heroin, please heed this caution. SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) sent out a notification last week, warning people that a deadly form of heroin is causing deaths in the Northeast.

Since the first of the year, thirty-none overdose deaths occurred in Pittsburgh and Rhode Island from heroin contaminate with fentanyl. Fentanyl is a powerful opioid, and kills opioid addicts accustomed to using heroin alone. Trends like these can spread rapidly, so if you are reading this and know someone who uses IV heroin, warn them about this deadly heroin.

When I first read SAMHSA’s notification, I wondered if I should put the warning on my blog. Being realistic, I know some addicts will think, “How can I get some of that? It sounds like good stuff!” That’s the insanity of addiction…people are dying from a variety of heroin and other addicts want to try the deadly substance, believing they can use without harm.

In the interest of harm reduction, I’m going to describe precautions that addicts, still in active addiction, can take to reduce the risk of overdose death. This information can be accessed at: http://harmreduction.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/getting-off-right.pdf

1. Don’t use alone. Use a buddy system, to have someone who can call 911 in case you stop breathing. Do the same for another addict. Obviously you shouldn’t inject at the same time. Stagger your injection times.
Many states now have Good Samaritan laws that protect the overdose victim and the person calling 911 for help, so that police don’t give criminal charges to people who do the right thing by calling for help for an overdose.
Take a class on how to give CPR so that you can revive a friend or acquaintance with an overdose while you wait on EMS to arrive.
2. Get a naloxone kit. I’ve blogged about how one patient saved his sister with a naloxone kit. These are easy to use and very effective. You can read more about these kits at the Project Lazarus website: http://projectlazarus.org/
3. Use new equipment. Many pharmacies sell needles and syringes without asking questions. Your addict friends probably can tell you which pharmacies are the most understanding.
Don’t use a needle and syringe more than once. Repeated use dulls the needle’s point and causes more damage to the vein and surrounding tissue. Don’t try to re-sharpen on a matchbook – frequently this can cause burrs on the needle point which can cause even more tissue damage.
4. Don’t share any equipment. Many people who wouldn’t think of sharing a needle still share cottons, cookers, or spoons, but hepatitis C and HIV can be transmitted by sharing any of this other equipment. If you have to share or re-use equipment, wash needle and syringe with cold water several times, then do the same again with bleach. Finally, wash out the bleach with cold water. This reduces the risk of transmitting HIV and Hepatitis C, but isn’t foolproof.
5. Use a tester shot. Since heroin varies widely in its potency, use small amount of the drug to assess its potency. You can always use more, but once it’s been injected you can’t use less. The New England overdose deaths described by SAMHSA may have been avoided if the addicts had used smaller tester shots instead of shooting up the usual amount.
6. Use clean cotton to filter the drug. Use cotton from a Q-tip or cotton ball; cigarette filters are not as safe because they contain glass particles.
7. Wash your hands thoroughly before preparing your shot, and clean the injection site with an alcohol wipe if possible. Don’t use lemon juice to help dissolve heroin, as it carries a contaminant that can cause a serous fungal infection.
8. Opioid overdoses are much more likely to occur in an addict who hasn’t used or has used less than usual for a few days, weeks, or longer. Overdose risks are much higher in people just getting out of jail and just getting out of a detox. Patients who have recently stopped using Suboxone or Subutex may be more likely to overdose if they resume their usual amount of IV opioids.
9. Don’t mix drugs. Many opioid overdoses occur with combinations of opioids and alcohol or benzodiazepines, though overdose can certainly occur with opioids alone.
10. Don’t inject an overdosed person with salt water, ice water, or a stimulant such as cocaine or crystal methamphetamine – these don’t work and may cause harm. Don’t put the person in an ice bath and don’t leave them alone. Call for help, and give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if you can.

To people who believe I’m giving addicts permission to use, I’d like to remind them that addicts don’t care if someone gives them permission or not. If an addict wants to use, what other people think matters little. But giving people information about how to inject more safely may help keep the addict alive until she wants to get help.

The Harm Reduction Coalition has excellent information on its website: http://harmreduction.org