Posts Tagged ‘heroing overdose death’

Heroin Epidemic versus Pain Pill Addiction Epidemic

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I’m surprised at all the coverage heroin addiction has received in the past few months. Breathless headlines are appearing in all forms of media about our “new” addiction problem. Friends send me links to articles about addiction since they know that’s the field I work in. I’m as surprised to see all the media coverage now as I used to be puzzled about the lack of coverage five years ago. I’ve been treating opioid addiction for the last fourteen years, and the opioid addiction epidemic isn’t new. It’s been very well established for years.

Perhaps the idea of using heroin jolts people more than the idea of using prescription opioids. Maybe people don’t understand that prescription opioid addiction has the same physiologic process as heroin addiction. Manufactured pain pills have less variation in content than balloons of black tar heroin, so there may be less risk of overdose. However, the body responds the same to both types of opioids. The body develops addiction and physical dependency in the same way to both heroin and prescription opioids, and withdrawal symptoms and cravings are the same. Both overdose and death happens with both types of opioids.

Perhaps heroin is perceived as the hardest of hard drugs, and therefore data about heroin addiction captures more attention than pain pill use. Maybe the use of heroin crosses a line that’s not perceived by prescription opioid addiction.

Can it be that there are still people who believe if it is a prescription medication, that it’s safe? Or is it just easier to justify the misuse of a pain pill? Communities with years of rampant pain pill addiction are only now wringing their hands because of heroin addiction. These communities are now demanding action from our government.

I’m glad for the attention to the problem of opioid addiction because I’ve seen way too much complacency about this issue for way too long.

I’m also irritated.

In 2009, I wrote a book about pain pill addiction. I was extremely lucky to get an agent, and she shopped my book to four or five mid-level publishing houses. They weren’t interested because they felt the book didn’t have a broad enough appeal. I ended up self-publishing, and sold around 500-600 copies. That’s not too bad for a self-published book, but distribution could have been much broader through a publishing house. Having my book turned down by publishers with an utter lack of interest in the subject matter undoubtedly causes some of my irritation.

I went to the ASAM conference where the head of the CDC pledged to get involved in the treatment and prevention of opioid addiction. Don’t get me wrong; that’s a wonderful thing to hear. The problem is, that was in 2012.

For all who’ve just joined the movement to help opioid addicted people get help, welcome. I’m glad you’re here, and we can use your help. And forgive me for wishing you had been interested in this problem ten years ago.