Posts Tagged ‘mandated physician training’

Mandated Training?


 

 

 

 

It looks like 2017 is going to be the year of governmental solutions to the opioid use disorder problem.

I blogged last week about the regulation passed by the Virginia Board of Medicine. Now there’s a proposed bill making its way through the NC legislature, advocating new laws to help solve the addiction problem. Legislators certainly have their hearts in the right place. I agree with many parts of the proposed bill.

But now, I’d like to suggest a new regulation: ask all doctors to take an eight-hour course on opioid use disorder and its treatment with medication-assisted treatments, as a prerequisite to renewing their licenses.

I can hear my colleagues already howling with indignation. I’d feel the same way if I were them. It’s hard to admit you don’t have the education you need in an area of medicine. But this specialized area of medicine powerfully influences nearly all other subspecialties of medicine, so the consequences of neglecting the disease of addiction can be enormous.

Before I listen to my fellow physicians’ protests, I’d like to give examples, from my own community, of some things medical providers have done with patients prescribed opioids, and with patients who have opioid use disorder. I believe they all could have been handled better. Patient details have been changed to protect identities.

Example number one:

One of my patients needed to have surgery on his lumbar spine. He went to see the orthopedic specialist and was told he had to taper off methadone before the procedure could be done. I asked my patient why the doctor told him this, and the patient said he didn’t know. The patient said he was also told he couldn’t be “allowed” to have any pain medicine after he left the hospital after this surgery.

I’ve had other doctors in my area tell patients the same thing. One local weight loss surgeon tells patients they have to come off their evidence-based treatments (methadone or buprenorphine) for their potentially fatal medical illness (opioid use disorder) before he will agree to do any sort of gastric bypass weight loss surgery.

I was eager to have a discussion with my patient’s orthopedic surgeon, but my patient told me not to bother. He said he wasn’t going back to that surgeon anyway, and planned to get a second opinion at a nearby teaching hospital. I told him I thought this was a very good idea, though I was disappointed I couldn’t talk to the orthopedic surgeon. I was actually looking forward to that conversation. Probably the maniacal gleam in my eye made my patient tell me not to call.

Example number two:

Several weeks ago, I saw a new patient who was seeking admission to our opioid treatment program after being kicked out of a pain clinic. “Tim” (not his real name) had been going to several different pain clinics for years, and had been misusing his medication for at least two years. He was snorting oxycodone, around 150mg per day, and failed a pill count done by his pain medicine physician. His pain management doctor dismissed him from the practice, citing a “zero tolerance,” with no referral or further help. His friends told him about our treatment program, so he came for admission.

Tim was offered a choice between methadone and buprenorphine as treatment medications. He was so vehemently opposed to buprenorphine that it made me curious. He said that buprenorphine made him so sick, he nearly died.

I had already looked at his information on the prescription monitoring program, and saw that a few months ago, the physician assistant at his pain clinic prescribed Belbuca, along with relatively high doses of the usual immediate and extended release hydromorphone. This had piqued my interest.

Belbuca is a form of buprenorphine that’s approved for the treatment of pain. We don’t use it to treat addiction because it doesn’t have FDA approval for that purpose, and therefore isn’t covered by the DATA 2000 law.

Obviously this physician’s assistant who prescribed Belbucca failed to realize it would precipitate withdrawal in this patient who had been on full opioids for months.

I asked him to describe what happened after he took the first Belbucca. He said he felt like he had immediate onset of intense nausea and repeated vomiting so bad that he called EMS to take him to the hospital. He said he thought he was dying.

It doesn’t sound like anyone who saw the patient at the hospital told my patient his reaction was completely predictable.

I tried to explain to my patient that he may not get sick with buprenorphine if it were prescribed properly, but he was having none of it. That was OK, because methadone is still a great treatment for his opioid use disorder.

Example number three:

Some patients at our opioid treatment program stabilize on buprenorphine and then transfer to an office-based setting for care in a less restrictive setting. These patients have done well for months, so we wish them well, send their requested records, and encourage them to continue getting counseling in some form.

However, for some reason, some pain clinics take these patients off buprenorphine and start short-acting opioids. I’ve blogged about this problem before, dismayed at the predictable return of their opioid use disorder. They fail pill counts, and then get kicked out of treatment, having been set up to fail by their provider.

Now, things are getting weirder.

One patient, who did well for seven months at our opioid treatment program, transferred to a local office-based buprenorphine program. She did well for a few months, until she was switched to immediate and extended-release hydromorphone, which had been her drug of choice when she was in active addiction.

This patient predictably lost control of how she was taking this hydromorphone, started injecting it, and failed a pill count. Her doctor then told her she must go for an assessment at a substance abuse treatment facility in order to continue being prescribed hydromorphone.

Ummm…here’s the thing…she was started on buprenorphine in the first place because she had an opioid use disorder.

I’m not saying every patient with opioid use disorder immediately loses control of their medication if they’re prescribed opioids. But after less than a year of recovery from severe, intravenous opioid use disorder, you don’t have to be psychic to predict this would happen. Handing this patient a bottle of her drug of choice with a thirty-day supply triggered a relapse back to intravenous drug use.

Example number four:

I’ve saved the craziest for last. This example is tragic, both because of the bad patient outcome, and because so many doctors dropped the ball on this patient.

The patient, who developed opioid use disorder during treatment of chronic pain syndrome, developed severe mid-back pain. He told the emergency room doctor that he had been injecting the pain pills prescribed to him by a local pain medicine practice, and the emergency department physician noted track marks on his arms.

The patient had a limited work up and was sent home with a diagnosis of non-specific back pain and referred back to his pain clinic. The patient, miserable with intense and severe pain very unlike his chronic pain, returned to that hospital’s emergency department three more times. On the next to the last time, he says he was told that the doctor would not see him because he was a pain medication seeker.

Several days later, on his last visit to the emergency department, the patient was nearly comatose, with a high fever and labs indicating sepsis, and overwhelming blood infection. The patient was immediately admitted to the hospital and started on a range on antibiotics, but failed to improve. His relative demanded transfer to the local teaching hospital, an hour away.

Upon arrival at the teaching hospital, this 44 year -old man was diagnosed with a spinal abscess that extended from the neck all the way to the end of the spinal cord. This infection had obviously started at the area of his intense back pain. His spinal cord was being bathed in pus rather than spinal fluid.

He was not expected to live.

He was taken to the operating room, where the infection was drained and washed away, and dead tissue removed. Against all odds, the patient survived, though he was a quadriplegic when he woke up after surgery.

After being treated with antibiotics for many weeks, he was sent to a physical rehabilitation hospital for months. Eventually, he regained some strength in his arms and legs, and against all odds, improved to the point he could feed himself, and could walk with great difficulty, with two canes. He was eventually released from the physical rehabilitation hospital.

Eight months since his last appointment, he went back to his pain clinic. The doctor resumed prescribing the same medications that the patient had been misusing.

Wait a minute, you will say. Surely that doctor wasn’t told about the whole IV use, spinal abscess, quadriplegia thing, right? Wrong. Records show he did know.

The patient, after trying very hard not to inject these medications, finally came to our opioid treatment program, and asked for help. He was referred to us not by our local hospital’s physicians, not by anyone at the teaching hospital, not by social workers at that hospital, not by the physical rehabilitation hospital, and not by his pain management doctor.

His friends, in treatment at our OTP for their opioid use disorder, and told him to come to us for help.

He was started on sublingual buprenorphine and has done beautifully.

One day, after he’d been on a stable dose of buprenorphine for a few weeks, I asked him what he thought when his pain management doctor offered to put her back on hydromorphone. He said, “I was surprised. I didn’t think it was a good idea, but I was in pain and in withdrawal, so I just took the prescription.”

I understood. After all his time in the hospital, this patient hadn’t had any treatment for the disease of opioid use disorder. He’d only had treatment of the sequellae of opioid use disorder.

At that time, saving his life was the most important thing. But later, why not address the original disease that caused this million-dollar hospital treatment admission? Why not direct the patient to treatment of his opioid use disorder when released from the hospital and/or physical rehab facility? Why not pause for more than a moment before writing a prescription for the same drug that caused the whole mess?

 

All physicians make mistakes, usually out of ignorance, and I’m no different. But now, the opioid addiction problem is so bad that each state is passing laws to fix the problem. Isn’t it worth passing a law that makes sure all physicians are part of the solution?

At a minimum, let’s teach all doctors that substance use disorders are diseases, and that we do have treatments available. Some treatments work better than others, and medication-assisted treatment of opioid use disorder works very well. In fact, there’s more evidence to support MAT than anything they are doing in their practices. Why not refer patients with problems rather than shaming and ignoring them?

Let’s teach physicians that failure to diagnose and refer patients with substance use disorder for appropriate treatment is malpractice, just as it is for all other medical problems.