Posts Tagged ‘medication-assisted treatment as 12-step groups’

Tiny Candle of Hope

 

 

Every Friday at 6 pm at the Crossfire Biker’s church in North Wilkesboro, NC, people gather to attend a tiny meeting of Narcotics Anonymous, called the Brushy Mountain Group.

It’s not a large meeting; only six to eight people are there on any given Friday. It’s not an old and established meeting; it only started three months ago. But this meeting’s impact could be massive because it has the potential to change the lives of the participants.

This meeting was started with the intention of giving all people seeking recovery a place to get well. Applying the spiritual principles of acceptance and unconditional love, this NA meeting welcomes every person who wishes to recover from the disease of addiction.

This meeting makes no distinction between members who are prescribed methadone, buprenorphine, anti-depressants, stimulants, or other medications. Everyone is welcome to attend and everyone is welcome to share their experience, strength and hope. The recovering people who happen to be prescribed methadone and buprenorphine are treated as full members.

For critics who say Narcotics Anonymous is meant to be a program of complete abstinence from all drugs, people at this meeting have no issue with this statement. They know there is a difference between using drugs and taking medication. Surely the founders of NA never meant for members to be completely abstinent from all medications!

These members know the Third Tradition of Narcotics Anonymous says, “The only requirement for membership is the desire to stop using.” The assumption is that this means using drugs, not medications. At this meeting, members make their own decisions about their “clean date.” For most, the clean date is the day after their last illicit drug use.

At this meeting, the Fifth Tradition of Narcotics Anonymous is felt to be of the upmost importance, and should be a main guiding principle of every meeting: “Each group has but one primary purpose: to carry the message to the addict who still suffers.” No clean time distinctions are made. This still-suffering addict may be a newcomer, or it may be a member with twenty years of recovery. Suffering is suffering, and the group is there to support suffering members.

If a participant shares about taking medication, no one clutches at their pearls and gasps. No one  tut-tuts and asks them to shut up and talk to someone after the meeting. These people are given the same esteem as all other members. The others listen in respectful silence, and sharing continues after that person is finished.

Participants don’t often share about medication, except in passing. Most share about how they are feeling and how their emotions affect their recovery. They talk about situations that could cause a relapse, and they share gratitude for achievements big and small. They talk about how to handle the guilt from their actions in active addiction, or about how they want to do a better job raising the children.

In other words, an observer couldn’t tell this meeting was any different from any other NA meeting where recovery is underway.

This meeting is a tiny candle, spreading just a flicker of light into a small corner of one community darkened by the opioid use disorder epidemic.

But what if this light spread…what if more 12-step meetings welcomed people on methadone or buprenorphine with open arms, with hugs and unconditional love instead of judgment and put-downs?

Then 12-step recovery could be ablaze with the light of changing lives.

That’s my prayer.