Posts Tagged ‘methadone guest dose’

Guest Dosing at Opioid Treatment Programs

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Patients of opioid treatment programs have to dose daily on their medication, unless they meet criteria for take home doses. For buprenorphine (formerly known as Suboxone or Subutex) regulations have loosened in many states, so that take home doses are granted much earlier. (The federal regulations have completely dropped the time in treatment requirement for take home doses of buprenorphine.) But for methadone, patients have to dose at the facility each day for at least the first ninety days, and after that, if doing well, they can get up to three take homes per week for the next ninety days, then up to four per week after a half of a year, and so on.

What happens if the patient needs to go out of town?

There are three options: leave treatment, the worst option, because of the increased risk of death for patients who leave treatment; special take home doses, often risky if the patient isn’t able to take them as prescribed; and guest dosing.

Guest dosing means a patient of one treatment program can be dosed at another program if that patient travels to another area. All opioid treatment programs send their patients for guest dosing and allow guest dosing for patients of other facilities. It should be a smooth and simple process, under ideal circumstances.

But sometimes circumstances get complicated.

Most difficult are the last-minute guest dosing requests. These tend to come at particularly stressful times for the patient, because often a patient’s family member is sick, or just passed away. The patient needs to be with his family.

Setting up guest dosing at the last minute is more difficult for the referring clinic, the accepting clinic, and the patient. Most clinics ask for 24-48 hours advance notice for guest dosing, but some situation don’t allow that much time. We do the best we can, try to explain circumstances to the receiving clinic, and usually are able to work out something.

Guest dosing requires good communication between clinics. Usually the home clinic needs to fax a form with the patient’s picture, their dose, and any take home doses to be dispensed. Most receiving clinics like to see at least the last three drug screen results. Some receiving clinics ask for a doctor’s signature to assure the physician is aware of the guest dosing request. Then when the guest dosing patient arrives at the receiving program, the nurse calls to verbally confirm all of the info on the guest dosing request.

Some opioid treatment programs charge steep guest dosing fees, affecting the patients’ ability to pay for guest dosing. Some clinics charge a one-time fee to set up guest dosing, and after that pays the same as any other patient dosing at that clinic. Some programs charge elevated fees every day the patient guest-doses.

As the medical director, I am consulted any time one of our patients wants to guest dose at another clinic, and any time a patient from another clinic wants to guest dose. We have general guidelines for guest dosing, but often have to consider other factors.

For example, at both of the treatment centers where I work, we prefer not to guest dose patients during induction. Induction is the riskiest time of treatment, and usually lasts at least thirty days. But each request must be considered and the risk/benefit analyzed. What about if a patient admitted three weeks ago finds out a close relative is dying, and wants to be with them? I might agree with guest dosing such a patient, if she is doing well, isn’t actively using benzodiazepines or alcohol, and won’t be gone for many days.

Some clinics won’t allow guest dosing for any patient with positive drug screens. Generally I would agree with that, but for me it depends on what the drug is, and why the patient needs to go out of town, and for how long. For example, if a patient is stable on his dose, but is still smoking marijuana with every drug screen positive for THC, I’d still support guest dosing if this patient needs to work out of town. I’m not OK with continued illicit marijuana use, but the problems caused by missing a work opportunity may be greater than problems caused by marijuana use. If that same patient were using benzodiazepines or alcohol, I probably wouldn’t agree with guest dosing, due to the much higher risk of methadone when combined with these drugs. If the marijuana-smoking patient wanted to guest dose out of town in order to attend a friend’s bachelor party…I’d be hesitant, as I’ve heard rumors that these events tend to involve heavy drinking of alcohol. I’d have to talk to the patient.

Guest dosing in patients on buprenorphine is usually out of the question, since so few programs are using buprenorphine. One of the programs where I work is owned by CRC Health, and they are the only large opioid treatment program operator (that I know of) offering buprenorphine at all of their clinics. If a buprenorphine patient is lucky enough to be traveling near one of CRC’s clinics, guest dosing can be arranged easily.

But since buprenorphine is such a safer medication than methadone, usually we can get permission for take home doses, if the patient doesn’t already qualify for them. Even though federal regulations dropped the time-in-treatment requirements for take homes in buprenorphine patients, my state still requires time in treatment, unless we ask for an exception, which is usually granted.

The whole goal of treatment is to help drug addicts regain their ability to live a normal life. Opioid treatment programs should make every effort to remove obstacles to travel during treatment, while still following state and federal regulations. And of course, the freedom to travel and guest dose must be balanced with patient safety. Ideally, the decisions regarding guest dosing should be made by the physician, who is informed by the input of the treatment team, so that the best possible decisions can be made.