Posts Tagged ‘needle exchange’

Harm Reduction Dilemma

Harm Reduction Cat

 

 

 

 

What happens when harm reduction tenets clash with actual patient experience? That’s my recent dilemma.

Our opioid treatment center is blessed to have an organization that comes to our facility to do free testing for HIV and Hepatitis B and C. They also do needle exchange, or more precisely, they distribute clean needles to anyone who wants them.

Our patients have benefitted tremendously from the free HIV and hepatitis testing. Many of our patients have been diagnosed with active Hepatitis C. Since we now have a Federally Qualified Health Center in a neighboring town, about an hour away, our patients can get treatment for Hep C, even if they have no insurance or Medicaid. I’d estimate that two or three dozen patients have been diagnosed with Hep C, been referred for treatment, and are now cured of their Hep C.

The value of this can’t be overstated. Besides reducing the burden of Hep C in the community, these patients are free from worry that their Hep C will cause future problems. They don’t have to worry about it anymore, if they remain in recovery.

Our dilemma isn’t about this part of what they do, but about the needle exchange.

At our facility, we endorsed harm reduction as a healthy goal. If patients inject drugs, we want them to be as safe as possible, while still hoping they will be able to quit injecting once they get some traction in treatment.

However, some established patients, doing well now and free from illicit drugs, have told us the available free clean needles are a trigger for them to use drugs intravenously again.

This isn’t supposed to happen. Studies about needle exchange have not showed that clean needles influence people to inject drugs who weren’t already planning to inject drugs, which is why we’ve been supportive of the needle exchange.

But now we have some specific patients who link a relapse to intravenous drug use (usually intravenous methamphetamine or cocaine) to the available clean needles. These patient experiences contradict what the studies show us.

What should we do?

We need the services of Hepatitis and HIV testing, but we don’t patients to relapse, obviously. Do we ask the organization to keep do the free testing, but put the clean needles away and not mention them?

We had a spirited debate about the issue last week at our case staffing/treatment team meeting. This topic raised some passionate feelings both pro and con clean needle exchange, which surprised me a little. Some personnel thought patients shouldn’t be offered clean needles because, after all, these were patients in treatment who should be trying to be drug-free. Other people pointed out that continued intravenous drug use is inevitable, to some degree, in patients trying to get help, and we should want these patients to be as safe as possible while they inject, citing evidence about reduction of transmission of HIV and Hep C with needle exchange.

Some people felt the patients reporting that their drug use was triggered by being offered clean needles was an excuse, an effort to displace blame from themselves onto someone else. Those people felt these patients were going to use anyway and used needles exchange as a scapegoat.

I listened to everyone and decided there was possible truth to everything that was being said, but there was no way to know for sure.

In the end, we decided to ask our patients who were most vocal about the needle exchange program being a relapse trigger if they would talk to the personnel who work for the harm reduction agency that supplies the testing and clean needles. I thought offering information in both directions would be a good start.

Patients are often the harshest critics of other patients who aren’t doing well. Many times, I’ve had a patient tell me I ought to kick another patient out of treatment because they were still using drugs. Of course, I have to tell them I can’t talk about any other patient, but in general, we try to keep patients in treatment rather than turn them away for drug use, although sometimes we do refer them to more intense treatment.

Sometimes patients say that other patients using drugs makes them feel triggered to use drugs too. I can’t deny anyone’s experiences. If someone says they are triggered, then they are. And we do want to provide a safe treatment facility. How much drug use should we tolerate if it negatively impacts other patients’ treatment experiences?

What do my readers think? Is offering clean needles at a treatment program going too far, as some of our OTP employees think? Is it not going far enough, and should we offer safe injecting sites if it were legally allowed, as it is in Canada and elsewhere?

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