Posts Tagged ‘New Opioids’

New Opioids

I’ve blogged about states that have passed new laws addressing the prescribing of opioids, but the manufacturers of prescription opioids medications also have made changes to help reduce the potential for medication misuse. Of course, opioids will never be misuse-proof, but at least it’s a little harder to misuse some of the newer ones.

Oxecta is a new immediate-release brand of the drug oxycodone. It’s formulated so that it breaks into chunks when crushed, instead of a powder. When it’s mixed with water, it forms a gel so that it can’t be injected. This pill contains sodium laurel sulfate, a substance that irritates the nose if snorted.

Lazanda is a new delivery form of a very potent opioid, fentanyl. This brand is designed to be used as a nasal spray, which I would expect to be very addictive. The preparation itself has no anti-abuse features, but in order to distribute, dispense, prescribe, or be prescribed this medication, parties have to sign an agreement and be enrolled with the drug company. This extra scrutiny is hoped to deter diversion by distributor, pharmacy, doctor, or patient. Physicians must take a training program specific for this brand, and be enrolled with the drug company as a prescriber, or pharmacies can’t dispense to the patient.

Patients also need to complete a patient-prescriber agreement. Many people (like me) think doctors aren’t likely to jump through these extra hoops to prescribe this particular brand, when other brands of the same medication are already on the market, though not in the form of nasal spray.

Remoxy, another brand of oxycodone, hasn’t yet been FDA approved. Supposedly, it’s resistant to injection or snorting, and also has been formulated to be resistant to alcohol extraction.

Drug companies are now required by the FDA to have plans to evaluate and mitigate the risks associated with the opioid drugs they manufacture, particularly if they make sustained release or long-acting opioid preparations. This cooperation by drug manufacturers is a necessary part of turning the tide of opioid addiction in this country.

Last year, Purdue Pharma re-formulated OxyContin, making it more difficult to crush to snort or inject.  I noticed a sudden drop-off in patients entering treatment for pain pill addiction who said OxyContin was their drug of choice. During the years 2002 through 2007, nearly all of the opioid addicts I admitted to treatment said OxyContin was their preferred drug. It became obvious that the re-formulation made a big difference.

Addicts can and will still abuse these medications orally to get high, but the new formulations really do reduce abuse by making pills less likely to be snorted or injected.