Posts Tagged ‘opioid addiction in pregnancy’

North Carolina Pregnancy & Opioid Exposure Project

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaancpoep

Imagine being in a room filled with more than four hundred people: social workers, nurses, substance abuse counselors, and doctors specializing in obstetrics, pediatrics, and addiction medicine. Every one of them are there to learn how to care for pregnant women using opioids or addicted to opioids.

This actually happened earlier this month at the POEP conference in Greensboro, NC. (POEP stands for Pregnancy & Opioid Exposure Project. You can learn more about this organization at their website: http://www.ncpoep.org )

This organization, funded through a federal block grant through the NC Department of Mental Health, is run by the UNC School of Social Work. The organization has managed to bring together many of the people in our state who take care of pregnant women with opioid addiction. The goal of POEP is to disseminate information, resources, and technical assistance regarding all aspects of opioid exposure in pregnancy. The organization was formed in 2012 in response to concerns about the problem of pregnant women being exposed to opioids.

This organization is talking about all opioid use in pregnancy, not only about addiction in pregnancy. Some pregnancy women are prescribed opioids for the treatment of pain. These women may have physical dependence on opioids, though they may not have the mental obsession and compulsion to take opioids. However, the same problems can be seen in the newborn whatever the reason the woman takes opioids, so there is overlap in the problems faced.

This conference had renowned speakers; Marjorie Meyer, an expert in maternal-fetal medicine from Vermont, was the keynote speaker. This doctor participated in the MOTHER trials, and also set up an innovative treatment method in Vermont for mothers addicted to opioids. She has written about her data, and contributed greatly to our knowledge about buprenorphine in pregnancy (see my blog post of February 28, 2015).

Dr. Hendree Jones, lead author of the MOTHER study, did an excellent session on myths about medication-assisted treatment in pregnancy. She’s also a world-renowned leader in the field of addiction in women.

Dr. Stephen Kandall was there, and spoke about the challenges of advocating for women with addiction, with some historical perspective. He wrote an outstanding book, “Substance and Shadow: Women and Addiction in the United States,” which is one of my all-time favorites. It’s one of the best books about females and addiction. This conference was the first time I met Dr. Kandall, and I got all creepy-gush-y, and dithered about how much I loved his book. I can be such a nerd at times, but he was very polite and gracious.

There were many sessions going on at the same time, so it was impossible to go to all of the sessions that I wanted to attend. Other speakers talked about how best to coordinate care for pregnant women when they go to the hospital to deliver their babies, how to work with the court system if the pregnant woman has legal problems, and how to work with female patients on opioids about family planning.

I was honored to be one of the four-doctor panel that was organized to answer audience questions about medication-assisted treatment with buprenorphine and methadone during pregnancy. We got some great questions, like how to deal with co-occurring benzodiazepine use during pregnancy. Our session was only forty-five minutes long, and we probably could have spent a few hours answering all their questions. I was also impressed by the thoughtful opinions and recommendations from the other three doctors, all leaders in our state.

This conference was a great experience. I felt like many of the attendees got a better view of what opioid-dependent pregnant women need, and where and how to direct them for the best care. I’m pleased people in our state cared enough to start the difficult work of informing families and care providers about the problem of opioid use and addiction during pregnancy.

POEP has a great website that I’ll recommend to the pregnant women I treat, and I’ll also recommend it to their obstetricians. That site has clear information not only for families, but also for care providers. Here are the fourteen important points for infant care providers, taken directly from the POEP website:

“Key Messages for Infant Care Providers Working with Families of an Opioid-Exposed Newborn
________________________________________
1. Parents should be counseled as early as possible (preferably well before delivery) about the need for close monitoring of an opioid-exposed infant.[2]
2. Parents should be encouraged to disclose any maternal opioid use that occurred during pregnancy and should be treated in a nonjudgmental manner.[3]
3. Hospital care of the newborn should be family-centered, meaning that the parents should be a driver in the care plan.
4. Parents should receive education about how opioid-exposed infants are monitored and how neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is treated at their delivery hospital.
5. There are various approaches to monitoring for neonatal abstinence syndrome in opioid-exposed infants, such as the use of the Finnegan Scoring tool.[2],[3]
6. Monitoring for the onset of NAS may mean the infant will be monitored in the hospital for up to 5 days.
7. Infants at risk of NAS may be monitored in the mother’s room, in the newborn nursery, special care nursery or neonatal intensive care, depending on hospital protocols and resources.
8. There are various approaches to the management of NAS including non-pharmacologic interventions and pharmacologic therapy, depending on the needs of the infant. Approaches include:
• Non-pharmacologic management of NAS: environmental controls emphasizing quiet zones, low lighting, and gentle handling. Loose swaddling, as well as holding and slow rocking of infant may be helpful. The use of a pacifier for excessive sucking is also helpful.[2],[6],[7]
• Pharmacologic management of NAS: the use of a variety of medication to ease the withdrawal symptoms of the infant. Common medications include opioids (dilute tincture of opium, morphine, or methadone) and phenobarbital.[2],[6],[7]
9. Breastfeeding is encouraged for women in medication assisted treatment, unless there are medical reasons to avoid it. Reasons to avoid breastfeeding include an HIV infection or specific medication for which breastfeeding is not safe.[2],[3]
10. Infants experiencing NAS may have difficulty establishing breastfeeding or bottle-feeding. Women may need additional encouragement and lactation consultation to support breastfeeding.[2],[3]
11. Whenever possible, having the newborn room-in with the mother while in the hospital is encouraged. Benefits include opportunity to initiate breastfeeding, bonding and decreased need for treatment of NAS.[1]
12. Some infants will experience NAS as a result of maternal opiate use through a treatment program (such as a methadone maintenance program) or by prescription (such as buprenorphine for an opioid use disorder or prescription narcotics for pain management). The opioid exposure alone in situations where the mother was adherent to a prescribed treatment plan would not constitute an appropriate reason for referral to Child Protective Services. See structured intake 1407 http://info.dhhs.state.nc.us/olm/manuals/dss/csm-60/man/
13. Not all infants at risk of NAS are identified in the hospital, particularly in situations where maternal use of opioids has not been disclosed. This may be due to women not disclosing legal or illegal use of opioids.[2]
14. Withdrawal symptoms from opioids may appear in the infant after discharge to home. It is important for providers working with the infant and the family in the community (pediatricians, CC4C, Early Intervention) to be aware of signs and symptoms of NAS. If the infant displays any of these signs or symptoms, the family should be encouraged to seek pediatric care promptly.[2]”

North Carolina has a great start in addressing the problem of opioid-exposed newborns. The organizers of POEP can stand as an example of how other states can begin to address this challenging situation. Neighboring states (you know I’m talking about Tennessee!) have walked in the opposite direction, preferring to view opioid use during pregnancy as a crime rather than the medical problem that it is. That’s sad, because an aggressive attitude of judgment is correlated with poorer outcomes for both mother and infant.

Congratulations to the organizers of the POEP conference. Hopefully it was the first of many more to come.

Inspired at AATOD

aaaaaaatod

I just got back from the AATOD (American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence) conference, and I feel inspired, enthusiastic, and relaxed.

Several days before I left for the conference, I talked to a pregnant patient at one of the opioid treatment programs where I work. This patient, dosing on methadone, said her obstetrician insisted she taper down on her dose during pregnancy. When she told me that, my shoulders slumped with fatigue and disappointment. This was a doctor I’ve called on the phone a few times, and met in person once. We’ve talked collegially, and I physically, personally handed her a copy of ACOG/ASAM (American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Society of Addiction Medicine) position paper on the treatment of opioid-addicted pregnant patients.

Needless to say, that document does NOT advise taper of methadone during pregnancy. When I talked to this obstetrician, I’d explained why we usually need to increase the dose during pregnancy. Yet now she’s telling a patient to lower her dose. This is not best practices.

I felt tired, and hopeless about improving physician education in my area. Do these doctors have Teflon brains, and all the information I’ve been trying to provide keeps sliding off their cortexes, into the ozone somewhere?

Yesterday at the AATOD conference, I heard a lecture by one of the main authors of the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research) trial, Dr. Karol Kaltenbach. I’ve posted blogs about this trial (see Dec 16, 2010, March 23, 2013), which randomized opioid-addicted pregnant women to treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine. The goal was to compare outcomes of the babies born to moms maintained on methadone versus buprenorphine.

Dr. Kaltenbach opened her lecture by making an excellent point: use of legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco during pregnancy are viewed as public health problems, even though they cause as much or more harm to the fetus as illicit drugs. Yet the general public demonizes moms who use illegal drugs. Pregnant women who use illegal drugs are faced with harsh moral judgments, and punitive responses.

Alcohol, a legal drug, causes harm to 40,000 kids per year, and is the leading preventable cause of developmental disabilities. Consistently, research shows physical and behavioral effects in the children born to moms who drink alcohol. Even though researchers have stated that there’s no safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, according to the 2011 NSDUH (National Survey of Drug Use and Health), 9% of pregnant women said they were current drinkers, 2.6 said they were binge drinking, and .4% were heavy drinkers.

Pregnant smokers of tobacco are more likely than non-smokers to have a variety of complications, including spontaneous abortions, placenta previa and placental abruption, retardation of fetal growth, low birth weight babies, and preterm labor and birth. After delivery, the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is six times higher than for babies of non-smoking moms. Their babies are more likely to have ADHD, inattention disorders, ear and respiratory infections.

Yet newspapers now publish sensational articles about “addicted babies” born to mothers with opioid addiction, while ignoring the more common and more harmful effects of alcohol and tobacco. Remember the “crack baby” scare of the 1990’s, which was a media creation with no backing by science?

From the MOTHER study we learned that babies born to moms on buprenorphine have about the same risk of withdrawal, called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), as babies born to moms on methadone. In both groups, fifty percent of the babies had NAS severe enough to need medication to treat opioid withdrawal. The babies were scored on the Finnegan scale, which grades the babies on many signs of withdrawal to indicate when treatment is needed. (By the way, at the AATOD conference I sat near Loretta Finnegan, creator of the Finnegan scale and internationally recognized for her many contributions to the field of alcohol and drug abuse!)

So in both groups, about half of the babies needed medication for withdrawal symptoms. However, the babies with NAS born to the moms on buprenorphine required 89% less medication (morphine solution) and spent 43% less time in the hospital as compared to the babies with NAS born to moms maintained on methadone. The babies born to moms on buprenorphine also spent 58% less time being medicated to treat their NAS.

That’s a significant benefit.

This study was very important for many reasons, but after these results, buprenorphine is slowly becoming the standard of care for pregnant opioid-addicted moms, if it’s available. True, there was a higher drop out of the moms on buprenorphine, but it was not statistically significant, and the moms didn’t leave treatment; they dropped out of the study for whatever reason.

Now for the exciting part: a supplemental study of these children is being completed. This data hasn’t yet been published, but Dr. Kaltenbach says it will show that kids of moms on methadone and buprenorphine were compared and assessed at three months, six months, twelve, twenty-four, and thirty-six months. A standardized scoring system for infant development called the Bayley Scale was used to study these children, and the groups were compared to scores for normal children.

Dr. Kaltenbach says there are no differences between the babies born to methadone versus buprenorphine, and better yet – both groups showed scores in the normal ranges on this scale. The scale measured things like language and motor skills, cognitive abilities, and conceptual and social skills.

The kids are alright!

This data is going to be a huge comfort to worried moms, dosing on methadone or buprenorphine.

And I got inspired at the AATOD conference. I heard one speaker tell the audience “you do it until they get it. You tell them over and over and over again. Whatever it takes.” And I thought to myself, this is correct. I can’t give up on the obstetricians in my area. Maybe they don’t agree with me, but I am not out on a limb with what I’m saying. It’s backed up with fifty years of studies and science. I am listening and reading information from the experts in the field. I need to be persistent, and keep repeating the data, mailing the data…skywriting the data…whatever.

It’s refreshing to be around people who understand opioid addiction and its treatment. It’s encouraging to hear how workers in the opioid addiction field are finding new ways to help our patients and advocate for them.

I’m going to call this OB – again –and re-inform her – nicely – about what’s found in that position paper, co-authored by doctors from her own specialty. I’m also going to suggest she direct some of her concern towards her patients who use the legal drugs of alcohol and tobacco, since they cause significant harm to infants.

And yes, I know most of the patients enrolled in OTPs also smoke, and I am going to help them with that, too…if they want it.

1. http://www.asam.org/docs/publicy-policy-statements/1-opioids-in-pregnancy—joint-acog-4-12.pdf?sfvrsn=2

2. “Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome after Methadone or Buprenorphine Exposure,” by Hendree Jones, Karol Kaltenbach, et. al., New England Journal of Medicine, December 9, 2010, 363;24: pages 2320-2331.