Posts Tagged ‘pregnant addict in Tennessee’

Criminally Pregnant

aaaaaacriminallypregnant

I usually don’t post a new entry so soon after the last, but this topic is time-sensitive.

I’m getting tired of writing about Tennessee’s crazy politicians but this time their insanity is so egregious that I can’t let it pass without comment.

The Tennessee house and senate passed a bill that allows a woman to be criminally charged if her baby is born drug dependent. If their Governor Haslam signs this bill, it will become law.

As we know, Tennessee has a terrible opioid addiction problem with one of the highest overdose death rates in the nation. Opioid addiction afflicts men and women in nearly equal numbers, and most of those women are in their child-bearing years. Thus, Tennessee has many pregnant women who have the disease of drug addiction.

Naturally, hospitals have seen a growing number of infants born with opioid withdrawal. Small rural hospitals may not have physicians who are educated about how to treat these babies. It’s a frightening situation, and the response is fear-based: make drug use during pregnancy a crime.
Politicians promote draconian laws that will punish these women, who are probably the most vilified segment of society, and gain favor with voters who don’t understand the underlying issues.

So now Tennessee has a law that makes getting pregnant a crime, if you have the disease of addiction. (By the way, there are other illnesses that can harm the fetus if the mom becomes pregnant, but we have no laws making pregnancy illegal for those patients.)

Supporters of this new insane law probably say it should encourage pregnant addicts to get help before their babies are born. That could be true, if Tennessee had adequate treatment programs in place. As we know, methadone and buprenorphine are the best treatments for opioid-addicted pregnant women, yet under this law, this gold-standard of treatment may also be considered illegal.

So should pregnant moms “just say no” and stop using opioids? We know that going through opioid withdrawal while pregnant is associated with bad outcomes for mom and fetus, what with increased risks of preterm labor, placental abruption, and low birth weights. Over the last fifty years, multiple studies repeatedly show better outcomes when you maintain the mom of a stable dose of methadone, or more recently buprenorphine, during the pregnancy.

If this bill is signed into law by Tennessee’s governor, we can predict what will happen.

After all, what would you do, if you are a pregnant addict and know you will be prosecuted if anyone discovers you’re drug user? You avoid prenatal care. Maybe you get an abortion, even if you really want a baby, because you don’t want to go to jail. Maybe you try to stop using opioids on your own, go into withdrawal, and have one of the complications we know to be common in such a situation. Maybe you have preterm labor at 30 weeks and your baby ends up in the intensive care unit for many months. Worse, maybe your baby doesn’t make it. Or your baby does make it, but is taken away from you at birth, because authorities say an addict can’t care for a baby. Your baby enters the foster care system, with its pitfalls.

In short, this law discourages medical care in the very population of women who can benefit the most from medical care and treatment of addiction!

But wait…this law says the woman can be charged if the baby is born dependent. What about pregnant women who smoke? The infants are technically dependent on nicotine, so that meets this law’s criteria. These women can also be criminally charged. Probably Tennessee would have to build a new jail just for those women, and of course Tennessee’s taxpayers would be happy to pay for their incarceration, right?

In the past, laws against drug use in pregnancy have been unevenly implemented. If you look at the cases that have been prosecuted, nearly all involved poor, non-white mothers. Maybe that’s because law enforcement knows that people of higher socioeconomic status can afford hire a lawyer to defend themselves against these ridiculous laws, which always get struck down on appeal, though that can take years.

Policies that inflict criminal penalties on pregnant women with the treatable disease of addiction cause harm to everyone. Hospitals have higher costs when a mom with no prenatal care arrives on their door step ready to deliver, with much higher rates of perinatal complications. Taxpayers end up paying the high costs of incarceration for these women. But most of all, the babies and their moms are harmed.

Let Governor Haslam know how you feel by writing to him: bill.haslam@tn.gov or call at: (615-741-2001)