Posts Tagged ‘President Trump’s opioid speech’

Trump’s Opioid Speech

 

 

 

 

 

 

At least five or six people asked me what I thought about the President’s address in which he declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency. I didn’t watch his address, but I did read a transcript of his speech.

When people insert the comment, “Believe me,” into what they are saying, I tend not to believe them. Perhaps it’s an occupational hazard, but that’s what I consider a “tell.” Just like the phrase, “I’m not gonna lie to you,” my brain assumes there’s a whooper of a lie headed my way.

However, the “believe me” phrase could be just a verbal tic on President Trump’s part, like the word “very” which he said eighteen times in his speech. Yes, I counted. I don’t know why that annoys me so much, except maybe I expect a more diverse vocabulary from the President. It’s very, very, very annoying.

I applaud his effort. He said some good things, and the overall message of his speech was that the U.S. has a problem, we need to do something about it, and here’s what I’m going to do to help. I could nitpick about the accuracy of some of the things he said, but I think he’s sincere in his desire to help people overcome substance use disorders.

But isn’t it disingenuous to tell people you plan to get approvals for treatment at the same time you are ending Obamacare? People need insurance to pay for medical care, so how will the 10 million or so who had insurance under Obamacare pay for treatment?

It was also disingenuous for him to say he’s “directing all executive agencies to use every appropriate emergency authority to fight the opioid crisis,” and that we should expect to see “Approvals that will unlock treatment for people in need and those approvals will come very, very fast…”

Money is being released quickly, from the 21st Century CURES Act, passed by Obama in December of 2016 and made available to states by April of this year. That is fast, for government money. I didn’t like Trump taking credit for legislation passed before he became president.

But those are trivial irritations compared to what’s important. Perhaps President Trump will pass legislation that gives people access to treatment for opioid use disorder. I hope that access will be for evidence-based treatment, and not for a “just don’t start” sort of campaign. We already endured the “Just say no” of Nancy Reagan. It’s not bad as far as it goes, and might prevent people from experimentation with drugs, but it’s of little use once opioid use disorder develops.

After President Trump’s speech, I am cautiously optimistic. I’ll have to see details before I get too excited, though. With so much at stake, I do hope the President allows experts to guide his policies. If we shoot a missile at opioid use disorder, let’s be sure it’s pointing in the right direction.