Posts Tagged ‘titan pharmaceutical’

Probuphine Implants: Impractical?

Probuphine

The more I learn about Probuphine, the less I think it will be practical for use in the average office-based opioid use disorder treatment setting. I predict it will be a specialty medication implanted by a few practitioners who take referrals from other doctors.

Braeburn Pharmaceuticals is sponsoring conferences for doctors to learn how to insert Probuphine, the form of buprenorphine that’s implanted under the skin like Norplant, the birth control medication. This medication is marketed by Titan Pharmaceuticals. Probuphine consists of four slender rods that are inserted just under the skin at the upper arm. These rods release buprenorphine over six months, when they have to be removed, and new rods implanted.

I wasn’t sure I wanted to do Probuphine implants, but I liked the idea of being able to do it, so I asked to attend one of their conferences to learn the procedure.

Alas, the company says only doctors who have performed minor surgical procedures over the past ninety days are eligible to learn to be an implanter of Probuphine. I can still prescribe it if I take the course, their letter says, but I’d have to refer to someone else to implant Probuphine.

Huh? I thought I could prescribe it already, since I have an “X” number. Maybe not.

If I can prescribe it but I can’t administer it, why would the patient see me at all? Why not just go directly to the doctor who can prescribe and implant?

I looked around the room during my recent addiction medicine conference and tried to imagine how many of these specialists had done surgical procedures over the past three months. There was one surgeon, and a few obstetricians, so I decided three out of sixty or so of the doctors who presently prescribe buprenorphine.

Even if the FDA approves Probuphine in May, I have a hard time imagining how Probuphine could be used in a typical office-based buprenorphine practice.

Because besides the implantation conundrum, who pays for it? Drug company representatives were unable to answer questions about the cost.

And how does the implant, the implanting physician, and the patient all arrive at the appointment time? Is the doctor expected to order the implant, store it in her office, and hope the patient shows up for the implantation? Surely we couldn’t give a prescription to the patient to take to a pharmacy for the implant, so I’m not sure how that’s going to work.

Won’t this medication need prior approval? Representatives from the drug’s manufacturer say “no,” but I have a hard time believing that.

I picture one or two sites in North Carolina that will have the resources to do the implants and probably keep them in stock, perhaps at a hospital pharmacy. Maybe the teaching hospitals will have the resources to do this.

Also, the Probuphine delivers drug levels equivalent to six to eight milligrams of sublingual buprenorphine, so patients at higher probably won’t be considered.

I’m starting to doubt the practicality of Probuphine at an average addiction medicine physician’s office.